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National Qualifications Frameworks (NQF) and Support for Alternative Transition Routes for Young People

  • Madhu SinghEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Technical and Vocational Education and Training: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (TVET, volume 24)

Abstract

The article deals with alternative transitions to further learning and into the world of work for young people from less qualified and marginalized backgrounds. It considers the importance of systemic, structural and institutional solutions – rather than the psychological solutions through counselling and guidance services – to youth transitions in conjunction with pathways established and maintained through NQFs. NQFs have become a new global phenomena. Many countries use them as tools for reform as well as for communication to share a common vision around mobility, transitions and recognition of all forms of learning. The paper starts with an introduction to the concept of ‘alternative transitions’. Evidence taken from 33 case studies compiled by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning (UIL) for the Global Inventory of National and Regional Qualifications Frameworks (UIL, Global inventory of national qualifications frameworks: country cases studies compiled by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning. University Interscholastic League, Hamburg, 2014; UIL, ETF, and CEDEFOP, Global inventory of regional and national qualifications frameworks. Volume I: Thematic chapters. University Interscholastic League, Hamburg, 2015a; UIL, ETF, and CEDEFOP, Global inventory of regional and national qualifications frameworks. Volume II: National and regional cases. University Interscholastic League, Hamburg, 2015b) is used to highlight whether and how NQFs are actually supporting alternative routes for youth in crisis. The paper concludes by arguing that a better understanding of NQFs could inform transition policies concerning youth. However, NQFs cannot themselves promote alternative transition routes to qualifications; other factors anchored in structural and institutional solutions need to be taken into account.

Keywords

Informal Sector Alternative Transition Qualification Framework Senior Secondary School Early School Leaver 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UNESCO Institute for Lifelong LearningHamburgGermany

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