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Elder Abuse pp 343-362 | Cite as

Elder Abuse Victims’ Access to Justice: Roles of the Civil, Criminal, and Judicial Systems in Preventing, Detecting, and Remedying Elder Abuse

  • Lori A. StiegelEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Recent high-profile cases of elder abuse—including those involving New York City philanthropist Brooke Astor and entertainer Mickey Rooney—have drawn attention to the fact that the three components of the US justice system—civil, criminal, and judicial—have crucial roles in preventing, detecting, and remedying elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation (“elder abuse”). This chapter provides an overview and comparison of the goals of the civil justice and criminal justice systems, and then focuses on impediments that victims may face in accessing the three system components and the ways in which lawyers, judges, and allied professionals can protect older persons from elder abuse, make victims whole, and hold perpetrators accountable. This chapter also addresses ideas and promising practices for improving the justice system’s response to elder abuse, and the potential benefits of involving justice system professionals in efforts to enhance the response of other systems that are relevant to elder abuse victims. No matter the form or the setting of elder abuse, there is some purpose that one or more components of the justice system can serve.

Keywords

Access to justice Civil justice system Criminal justice system Civil lawyers Elder abuse Elder courts Judges Judicial system Law enforcement Legal aid Prosecutors 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.American Bar Association Commission on Law and AgingWashingtonUSA

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