Oskar Rosenfeld, the Lodz Ghetto, and the Chronotope of Hunger

  • Sven-Erik Rose
Chapter

Abstract

Rose analyzes the treatment of hunger in Oskar Rosenfeld’s Lodz Ghetto writings (1941–1944). Among the most ubiquitous experiences of the Nazi ghettos, hunger runs ineluctably as a motif through diverse ghetto texts. Published in German as Wozu noch Welt and in English as In the Beginning Was the Ghetto, Rosenfeld’s ghetto writings offer one of the most complex treatments of ghetto hunger. Rose focuses on how Rosenfeld’s documentation of brute reality uses literary stylization and experimentation to articulate, in real rather than recollected time, the unfolding of the Holocaust. Rose analyzes in particular Rosenfeld’s philosophical dialogue “Golem and Hunger,” a meditation on the nature of hunger in the specific space and time of the ghetto, as compared to famine in China and India.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sven-Erik Rose
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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