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Climate of Lake Tana Basin

  • Wubneh Belete Abebe
  • Tesfahun G/Michael
  • Elias Sime Leggesse
  • Biaznelign S. Beyene
  • Fenta Nigate
Chapter
Part of the AESS Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies and Sciences Series book series (AESS)

Abstract

Lake Tana basin, the subbasin of Abbay (Blue Nile River), covers an estimated area of 15,114 km2 of which the Lake Tana accounts 20.47%. It is located in Amhara Region in the north western Ethiopian highlands. The mean elevation of the Basin is 2025 masl (meter above sea level), with the highest elevations at some 4100 masl in the Simien Mountains, in the north-eastern part of the basin and the lowest at the outlet of the lake into the Blue Nile at 1786 masl. The topography in the eastern side of the basin is dominated by the presence of two large shield volcanoes, Mt. Choke and Mt. Guna, while in the west it drops sharply to the adjacent Beles and Dinder basins. Bahir Dar city is located in the southern tip of the lake where the outlet of the lake into the Blue Nile River. The climate of the region is tropical highland monsoon with one rainy season between June and September. The air temperature shows a large diurnal but small seasonal change with an annual average of 20 °C. The distribution of rainfall of the region is controlled by the movement of the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) to the northward and southward. Based on rainfall variability analysis, 57.5% of the basin is found under less rainfall variability. Little has been done so far on understanding the effect of climate change on rainfall amount and distribution and hence of the Basin Rivers flows. The largest area of the basin (88.5%) is not affected by frost hazard.

Keywords

Climate Temperature Rainfall Lake Tana Blue Nile River 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wubneh Belete Abebe
    • 1
  • Tesfahun G/Michael
    • 1
  • Elias Sime Leggesse
    • 2
  • Biaznelign S. Beyene
    • 2
  • Fenta Nigate
    • 2
  1. 1.Amhara Design and Supervision Works EnterpriseBahir DarEthiopia
  2. 2.Blue Nile Water InstituteBahir Dar UniversityBahir DarEthiopia

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