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Determining the (Almost) Intangible: Measuring Relational Power

  • Enrico Fels
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Part of the Global Power Shift book series (GLOBAL)

Abstract

Following the analysis of aggregate power in Chap.  5, it is now important to more closely evaluate the alleged power shift between Washington and Beijing based on a relational understanding of power. Grounded on the insight that gaps in the material (and non-material) national elements of power might lead to power differences in nation states’ bilateral relations, it is clear that researchers also have to look at this aspect when trying to identify a potential power shift. Taking the results of Chap.  5 as a confirmation that China’s aggregate power vis-à-vis the United States has indeed been rising since the end of the Cold War, the basic assumption of this part of the study’s analysis is that if China had managed to win the allegiance of middle powers in Asia-Pacific between 1992 and 2012 with regards to security and/or economic cooperation, this would have represented a relational power shift as long as the United States were unable to improve its ties to the regional middle powers simultaneously.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Relational Power Foreign Policy Great Power Vote Behaviour 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Enrico Fels
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Global StudiesUniversity of BonnBonnGermany

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