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Taking Stock of Asia-Pacific’s Tangible Power Changes: Measuring Aggregate Power

  • Enrico Fels
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Part of the Global Power Shift book series (GLOBAL)

Abstract

After the previous discussion of the study’s theoretical framework, it is now time to address the research questions, particularly Q1. The basic assumption from the formulated research questions and the discussion in Chap.  3 is that if China’s aggregate power has accelerated since the end of the Cold War compared to that of the United States, then a power shift between the two nations has been taking place, a trend that would justify the worries of many authors discussed in Chap.  1.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Enrico Fels
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Global StudiesUniversity of BonnBonnGermany

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