Advertisement

Opening the Floor: The Rivalry Between Eagle and Dragon in Asia-Pacific

  • Enrico Fels
Chapter
Part of the Global Power Shift book series (GLOBAL)

Abstract

It was a warm, sunny day when the majestic grey aircraft carrier and the other 11 modern naval vessels of the flotilla crested the waves in a marginal sea belonging to the Pacific Ocean. Mist sprayed their bows like flakes of snow. The screeching gulls that had trailed the ships after they left port were long gone. The ships’ crews—several thousand men and women—were disciplined and conducted the ongoing combat drills of their battle group with unswerving routine. They were excited, had been well-trained for their mission and were honoured to serve their nation at sea. The ships’ banners displaying stars and stripes were waving proudly in the wind, telling a tale of their nation’s military prowess and long naval history. The officers on the bridge of the carrier were discussing the further developments of their maritime exercise, while enjoying cups of steaming hot tea.

Keywords

Gross Domestic Product Foreign Policy Global Financial Crisis Foreign Affair International Relation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Abbott, A. (2004). Methods of discovery. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  2. Acharya, A. (2007). Human security and Asian Regionalism: A strategy of localization. In A. Acharya & E. Goh (Eds.), Reassessing security cooperation the Asia-Pacific. Competition, congruence, and transformation. Cambridge: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  3. Ahn, B.-J. (2004). The rise of China and the future of East Asian integration. Asia-Pacific Review, 11(2), 18–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Allison, W. T. (2008). Primacy and unipolarity. The debate on American power in an asymmetrical world. Australian Army Journal, V(1), 91–103.Google Scholar
  5. Allison, G. (2012, August 21). Thucydides trap has been sprung in the Pacific. Financial Times. Retrieved March 10, 2015, from http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/5d695b5a-ead3-11e1-984b-00144feab49a.html#axzz3UOWmaOx2
  6. Allison, G., & Blackwill, R. D. (2013, February 16). Will China ever be no. 1? Foreign Policy. Retrieved November 24, 2014, from http://foreignpolicy.com/2013/02/16/will-china-ever-be-no-1/
  7. Arrighi, G. (2010). The long twentieth century. Money, power and the origins of our times. London: Verso.Google Scholar
  8. Art, R. J. (2010). The United States and China: Implications for the long haul. Political Science Quarterly, 125(3), 359–391.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Ashworth, L. M. (2014). A history of international thought. From the origins of the modern state to academic international relations. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  10. Avey, P. C., Desch, M. C., Long, J. D., Maliniak, D., Peterson, S., & Tierney, M. (2012). The FP survey: The Ivory tower. Foreign Policy, January/February, 90–93.Google Scholar
  11. Babones, S. (2011). The Middling Kingdom. Foreign Affairs, 90(5), 79–88.Google Scholar
  12. Banlaoi, R. C. (2003). Southeast Asian perspectives on the rise of China. Parameters, Summer, 98–107.Google Scholar
  13. Bazhanov, E. (1998). Russian perspectives on China’s foreign policy and military development. In J. D. Pollack, & R. H. Yang (Eds.), In China’s shadow. Regional perspectives on Chinese foreign policy and military development. RAND Report, pp. 70–90.Google Scholar
  14. Beardson, T. (2013). Stumbling giant. The threats to China’s future. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Bell, C. (2005). The twilight of the unipolar world. The American Interest, 1(2). Retrieved November 17, 2014, from http://www.the-american-interest.com/2005/12/01/the-twilight-of-the-unipolar-world/
  16. Bennett, A. (2010). Process tracing. In J. M. Box-Steffensmeier, H. E. Brady, & D. Collier (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of political methodology (pp. 702–721). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Bernstein, R., & Munro, R. H. (1997). The coming conflict with America. Foreign Affairs, 76(2), 18–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Bertelsmann Stiftung. (2014). Globalization Report 2014. Who benefits most from Globalization? Retrieved November 17, 2014, from http://www.bfna.org/sites/default/files/publications/Globalization%20Report%202014.pdf
  19. Betts, R. K. (1993). Wealth, power, and instability: East Asia and the United States after the Cold War. International Security, 18(3), 34–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Bhagwati, J. (2007). In defense of globalization. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Bijan, Z. (2005). China’s ‘peaceful rise’ to great-power status. Foreign Affairs, 84(5), 18–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Breslin, S. (2005). Power and production: Rethinking China’s global economic role. Review of International Studies, 31(4), 735–753.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Brooks, S. G., & Wohlforth, W. C. (2002). American primacy in perspective. Foreign Affairs, 81(4), 20–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Brüsemeister, T. (2008). Qualitative Forschung. Ein Überblick. Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Brzezinski, Z. (2005a, January/February). Make money, not war. Foreign Policy, No. 146, pp. 46–47.Google Scholar
  26. Brzezinski, Z. (2005b, January/February). Nuclear weapons change everything. Foreign Policy, No. 146, pp. 48–49.Google Scholar
  27. Brzezinski, Z. (2005c, January/February). America’s staying power. Foreign Policy, No. 146, p. 49.Google Scholar
  28. Buzan, B. (2010). China in international society: Is ‘peaceful rise’ possible? The Chinese Journal of International Politics, 3(1), 5–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Buzan, B., & Waever, O. (2005). Regions and powers. The structure of international security. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Callahan, W. A. (2005). How to understand China: The dangers and opportunities of being a rising power. Review of International Studies, 31(4), 701–714.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Chang, F. K. (2014). Economic and security interests in Southeast Asia. Orbis, 58(3), 378–391.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Christensen, T. J. (2001). Posing problems without catching up: China’s rise and challenges for US security policy. International Security, 25(4), 5–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Christensen, T. J. (2006). Fostering stability or creating a monster? The rise of China and US policy towards East Asia. International Security, 31(1), 81–126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Christensen, T. J. (2011a). The advantages of an assertive China. Responding to Beijing’s abrasive diplomacy. Foreign Affairs, 90(2), 54–67.Google Scholar
  35. Christensen, T. J. (2011b). Worse than a monolith. Alliance politics and problems of coercive diplomacy in Asia. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Chung, C.-p. (2010). China’s multilateral cooperation in Asia and the Pacific. Institutionalizing Beijing’s “good neighbour policy”. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  37. Clinton, H. (2010, October 28). America’s engagement in the Asia-Pacific. Retrieved November 8, 2011, from http://www.state.gov/secretary/20092013clinton/rm/2010/10/150141.htm
  38. Cohen, B. (2006). The macrofoundations of monetary power. In D. M. Andrews (Ed.), International monetary power (pp. 31–50). New York: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  39. Collier, D., & Elman, C. (2010). Qualitative and multimethod research: Organizations, publication, and reflections on integration. In J. M. Box-Steffensmeier, H. E. Brady, & D. Collier (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of political methodology (pp. 779–795). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  40. Copeland, D. C. (2012). Realism and neorealism in the study of regional conflict. In T. V. Paul (Ed.), International relations theory and regional transformation (pp. 49–73). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Crone, D. (1993). Does hegemony matter? The reorganization of the Pacific political economy. World Politics, 45(4), 501–525.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Czarnezki, J. J. (2011). Climate policy & US-China relations. Vermont Journal of Environmental Law, 12(3), 659–674.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Da Cunha, D. (1998). Southeast Asian perceptions of China’s future security role in its ‘backyard’. In J. D. Pollack & R. H. Yang (Eds.), In China’s shadow. Regional perspectives on Chinese foreign policy and military development. RAND Report, pp. 115–126.Google Scholar
  44. Daniel, F. J. (2014, July 14). Shanghai most likely headquarters for BRICS development bank. Reuters. Retrieved July 25, 2014, from http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/07/14/uk-brics-summit-idUKKBN0FJ19I20140714
  45. Danilovic, V. (2002). When the stake are high. Deterrence and conflict among major powers. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Department of the Treasury, & Federal Reserve Board. (2014, August 14). Major foreign holders of treasury securities. Retrieved September 12, 2014, from http://www.treasury.gov/ticdata/Publish/mfh.txt
  47. Dhaojiong, Z. (2005). Comment: Can China rise? Review of International Studies, 31(4), 775–785.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Dobson, W. (2009). Gravity shift. How Asia’s new economic powerhouses will shape the twenty-first century. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google Scholar
  49. Dong, S. L. (2006). When are power shifts dangerous? Military strategy and preventive war. Journal of International and Area Studies, 13(2), 53–71.Google Scholar
  50. Drake, B. (2012, November 1). American, Chinese public increasingly weary of the other. Pew Research Global Attitudes Project. Retrieved November 24, 2014, from http://www.pewglobal.org/2012/11/01/american-chinese-publics-increasingly-wary-of-the-other/
  51. Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2013). An uncertain glory. India and its contradictions. London: Allen Lane.Google Scholar
  52. Drezner, D. (2007). The new new world order. Foreign Affairs, 86(2), 34–46.Google Scholar
  53. Drysdale, P. (2010, September 6). China and Japan in landmark shift in Asian economic power? East Asia Forum. Retrieved November 9, 2010, from http://www.eastasiaforum.org/2010/09/06/china-and-japan-in-landmark-shift-in-asian-economic-power-weekly-editorial/
  54. Dutta, S. (1998). In J. D. Pollack & R. H. Yang (Eds.), In China’s shadow. Regional perspectives on Chinese foreign policy and military development. RAND Report, pp. 91–114.Google Scholar
  55. Dyer, G. (2014). The contest of the century. The new era of competition with China – and how America can win. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.Google Scholar
  56. Ebbighausen, R. (2014, September 11). Anti-westliche Allianz in Asien. Deutsche Welle. Retrieved September 17, 2014, from http://dw.de/p/1D9oo
  57. Economy, E. (2006). China’s rise in Southeast Asia: Implications for the United States. Journal of Contemporary China, 14(44), 409–425.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Evans, M. (2011). Power and paradox: Asian geopolitics and Sino-American relations in the 21st century. Orbis, 55(1), 85–113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Fawn, R. (2009). ‘Regions’ and their study: Wherefrom, what for and whereto? Review of International Studies, 35(1), 5–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Fearon, J. D., & Laitin, D. D. (2010). Integrating qualitative and quantitative methods. In J. M. Box-Steffensmeier, H. E. Brady, & D. Collier (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of political methodology (pp. 756–776). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  61. Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. (2015, September 18). Fred graph civilian unemployment rate and civilian employment-population ratio. FRED Economic Data. Retrieved September 18, 2015, from http://tinyurl.com/p2ptf45
  62. Fels, E. (2009). Assessing Eurasia’s powerhouse. An inquiry into the nature of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation. Bochum: Winkler Verlag.Google Scholar
  63. Fels, E. (2014). The regional significance of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) in light of Afghanistan’s instability. In S. Jonboboev, M. Rakhmimov, & R. Seidelmann (Eds.), Central Asia today: Countries, neighbors, and the region (pp. 323–346). Göttingen: Cuvillier Verlag.Google Scholar
  64. Ferguson, N. (2011). Civilization. The west and the rest. London: Allen Lane.Google Scholar
  65. Ferguson, N., & Kotlikoff, L. J. (2003). Going critical. American power and the consequences of fiscal overstretch. The National Interest, Fall(73), 22–32.Google Scholar
  66. Ferris, W. H. (1973). The power capabilities of nation-states. International conflict and war. Lexington: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
  67. Fisher, R. D., Jr. (2010). China’s military modernization. Building for regional and global reach. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  68. Fisher, R. D., Crochet, M., & Hardy, J. (2014, January 6). Liaoning completes successful first South China sea trip. Jane’s Defence Weekly.Google Scholar
  69. Foot, R., & Walter, A. (2011). China, the United States, and global order. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  70. Freedman, D. A. (2010). On types of scientific enquiry: The role of qualitative reasoning. In J. M. Box-Steffensmeier, H. E. Brady, & D. Collier (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of political methodology (pp. 300–318). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  71. Friedberg, A. L. (1994). Ripe for rivalry: Prospects for peace in a multipolar Asia. International Security, 18(3), 5–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Friedberg, A. L. (2011). A contest for supremacy. China, America, and the struggle for mastery in Asia. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  73. Friedberg, A. (2012). Bucking Beijing. An alternative US China policy. Foreign Affairs, 91(5), 48–58.Google Scholar
  74. Frisby, D. (1972). The Popper-Adorno controversy: The methodological dispute in German sociology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences, 2(1), 105–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Funabashi, Y. (2008). Keeping up with Asia: America and the new balance of power. Foreign Affairs, 87(5), 110–125.Google Scholar
  76. Furlong, P., & Marsh, D. (2010). A skin not a sweater: Ontology and epistemology in political science. In D. Marsh & G. Stoker (Eds.), Theory and methods in political science (pp. 184–211). Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  77. Gaullier, G., Lemoine, F., & Ünal-Kesenci, D. (2007). China’s emergence and the reorganisation of trade flows in Asia. China Economic Review, 18(2), 209–243.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. George, A. L., & McKeown, T. J. (1985). Case studies and theories of organizational decision making. In R. F. Coulam & R. A. Smith (Eds.), Advances in information processing in organisations (Vol. 2, pp. 21–58). Greenwich: JAI Press.Google Scholar
  79. Gerring, J. (2007). Case study research. Principles and practices. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  80. Gerring, J. (2010a). Causal mechanisms: Yes, but…. Comparative Political Studies, 43(11), 1499–1526.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. Gerring, J. (2010b). Case selection for case-study analysis. In J. M. Box-Steffensmeier, H. E. Brady, & D. Collier (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of political methodology (pp. 645–685). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  82. Gill, B. (1998). Chinese military modernization and arms proliferation in the Asia-Pacific. In J. D. Pollack & R. H. Yang (Eds.), In China’s shadow. Regional perspectives on Chinese foreign policy and military development. RAND Report, pp. 10–36.Google Scholar
  83. Gilpin, R. (1981). War and change in world politics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Glaser, B. S., & Medeiros, E. S. (2007). The changing ecology of foreign-policy making in China: The ascension and demise of the theory of ‘peaceful rise’. The China Quarterly, 190, 291–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. Goldman, E. O. (2011). Power in uncertain times. Strategy in the fog of peace. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  86. Goldstone, J. A. (2003). Comparative historical analysis and the knowledge accumulation in the study of revolutions. In J. Mahoney & D. Rueschemeyer (Eds.), Comparative historical analysis in the social sciences (pp. 41–90). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  87. Greenwald, G. (2014). Die Globale Überwachung. Der Fall Snowden, die amerikanischen Geheimdienste und die Folgen. Munich: Droemer.Google Scholar
  88. Gschwend, T., & Schimmelfennig, F. (2011). Introduction: Designing research in political science – a dialogue between theory and data. In T. Gschwend & F. Schimmelfennig (Eds.), Research design in political science. How to practice what they preach (pp. 216–225). Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  89. Gu, X. (2010). Theorien der internationalen Beziehungen. München: Oldenbourg Verlag.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  90. Hagström, L. (2012). ‘Power shift’ in East Asia? A critical reappraisal of narratives on the Diaoyu/Senkaku incident in 2010. The Chinese Journal of International Politics, 5(3), 267–297.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  91. Hall, P. A. (2003). Aligning ontology and methodology in comparative research. In J. Mahoney & D. Rueschemeyer (Eds.), Comparative historical analysis in the social sciences (pp. 373–404). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. Halper, S. (2010). The Beijing consensus: Legitimizing authoritarianism in our time. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  93. Haour, G., & von Zedtweitz, M. (2016). Created in China. How China is becoming a global innovator. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
  94. Harris, S. (1998). The role of China in Australia’s regional security environment. In J. D. Pollack & R. H. Yang (Eds.), In China’s shadow. Regional perspectives on Chinese foreign policy and military development. RAND Report, pp. 127–142.Google Scholar
  95. Heilmann, S., & Schmidt, D. H. (2014). China’s foreign political and economic relations. An unconventional global power. New York: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
  96. Helleiner, E. (2008). Political determinants of international currencies: What future for the US dollar? Review of International Political Economy, 15(3), 354–378.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  97. Herzog, R. (2014). Europe neu erfinden. Vom Überstaat zur Bürgerdemokratie. Munich: Siedler.Google Scholar
  98. Hogan, W. P. (1962). Economic relationships and the SEATO powers. In G. Modelski (Ed.), SEATO. Six studies (pp. 253–288). Melbourne: F. W. Cheshire.Google Scholar
  99. Hoge, J. F., Jr. (2004). A global power shift in the making: Is the United States ready. Foreign Affairs, 83(4), 2–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  100. Holslag, J. (2015). China’s coming war with Asia. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  101. Hughes, J. H. (2010). China’s place in Today’s world. The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies, 35(2), 167–223.Google Scholar
  102. Hunger, I. (2005). Biowaffenkontrolle in einer multipolaren Welt. Zur Funktion von Vertrauen in internationalen Beziehungen. Frankfurt (Main): Campus.Google Scholar
  103. Huntington, S. P. (1996). The clash of civilizations and the remaking of world order. New York: Simon & Schuster.Google Scholar
  104. Huntington, S. P. (1999). The lonely superpower. Foreign Affairs, 78(2), 35–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. Huntington, S. P. (2003). America in the world. The Hedgehog Review, Summer, 7–18.Google Scholar
  106. IISS. (2015). The military balance 2015. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  107. Ikenberry, G. J. (2001). After victory. Institutions, strategic restraint, and the rebuilding of order after major wars. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  108. Ikenberry, G. J. (2004). American hegemony and East Asian order. Australian Journal of International Affairs, 58(3), 353–367.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  109. Ikenberry, G. J. (2008). The rise of China and the future of the west: Can the liberal system survive? Foreign Affairs, 87(1), 23–37.Google Scholar
  110. Jaques, M. (2009). When China rules the world. The rise of the Middle Kingdom and the end of the western world. London: Allen Lane.Google Scholar
  111. John, P. (2010). Quantitative methods. In D. Marsh & G. Stoker (Eds.), Theory and methods in political science (pp. 267–284). Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  112. Johnson, C. (1995). The empowerment of Asia. The Australian Quarterly, 67(2), 11–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  113. Johnston, A. I. (2003). Is China a status quo power? International Security, 27(4), 5–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  114. Kahn, H. (1961). On thermonuclear war. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  115. Kalberg, S. (2001). Einführung in die historisch-vergleichende Soziologie Max Webers. Heidelberg: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  116. Kang, D. (2003). Getting Asia wrong: The need for new analytical frameworks. International Security, 27(4), 57–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  117. Kang, D. C. (2006). Why China’s rise will be peaceful: Hierarchy and stability in the East Asian region. Perspectives on Politics, 3(3), 551–554. p. 552.Google Scholar
  118. Kaplan, R. D. (2000, October 8). Who lost Russia? New York Times. Retrieved November 17, 2014, from http://www.nytimes.com/2000/10/08/books/who-lost-russia.html
  119. Katznelson, I. (2003). Periodization and preferences. Reflections on purposive action in comparative historical social sciences. In J. Mahoney & D. Rueschemeyer (Eds.), Comparative historical analysis in the social sciences (pp. 270–301). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  120. Keller, W. W., & Rawski, T. G. (2007). Asia’s shifting strategic and economic landscape. In W. W. Keller & T. G. Rawski (Eds.), China’s rise and the balance of influence in Asia (pp. 3–11). Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press.Google Scholar
  121. Kennedy, P. (1987). The rise and fall of the great powers. Economic change and military conflict from 1500 to 2000. New York: Random House.Google Scholar
  122. Khanna, P. (2008). The second world: Empires and influence in the new global order. New York: Random House.Google Scholar
  123. King, G., Keohane, R. O., & Verba, S. (1994). Designing social inquiry. Scientific inference in qualitative research. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  124. Kirk, R. (2009, November 5). Remarks by ambassador Ron Kirk at the US-Korea business council. Retrieved January 8, 2010, from http://www.ustr.gov/about-us/press-office/speeches/transcripts/2009/november/remarks-ambassador-ron-kirk-us-korea-busine
  125. Kirshner, J. (2008). Dollar primacy and American power: What’s at stake? Review of International Political Economy, 15(3), 418–438.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  126. Kissinger, H. (2011). China. Zwischen Tradition und Herausforderung. München: C. Bertelsmann.Google Scholar
  127. Knorr, K. (1975). The power of nations. The political economy of international relations. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  128. Kristof, N. D. (1993). The rise of China. Foreign Affairs, 72(5), 59–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  129. Kupchan, C. A. (1998). After Pax Americana. Benign power, regional integration, and the sources of a stable multipolarity. International Security, 23(2), 40–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  130. Kurth, J. (2012). Confronting a powerful China with western characteristics. Orbis, 56(1), 39–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  131. Lai, D. (2011). The United States and China in power transition. Carlisle Barracks: US Army War College Press.Google Scholar
  132. Lange, M. (2013). Comparative-historical methods. Los Angeles: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  133. Lardy, N. R. (2003, August 1). The economic rise of China: Threat or opportunity. Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.Google Scholar
  134. Layne, C. (1993). The unipolar illusion: Why new great powers will rise. International Security, 17(4), 5–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  135. Layne, C. (2006). Impotent power? Re-examining the nature of America’s hegemonic power. The National Interest, September/October(85), 41–47.Google Scholar
  136. Layne, C. (2009). The waning of US hegemony – myth or reality? A review essay. International Security, 34(1), 147–172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  137. Levi, M. (2013). The power surge. Energy, opportunity, and the battle for America’s future. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  138. Levin, M. L. (2008). The next great clash. China and Russia vs. the United States. Westport, CT: Praeger Security International.Google Scholar
  139. Lewis, J., & McNaughton Nicholls, C. (2014). Design issues. In J. Ritchie, J. Lewis, C. McNaughton Nicholls, & R. Ormston (Eds.), Qualitative research practice. A guide for social science students and researchers. Los Angeles: Sage.Google Scholar
  140. Lewis, J., Ritchie, J., Ormston, R., & Morrell, G. (2014). Generalising from qualitative research. In J. Ritchie, J. Lewis, C. McNaughton Nicholls, & R. Ormston (Eds.), Qualitative research practice. A guide for social science students and researchers (pp. 347–366). Los Angeles: Sage. esp. pp. 354–359.Google Scholar
  141. Li, Z. (2007, June 26). An irresponsible stakeholder. China Daily. Retrieved September 25, 2014, from http://china.org.cn/international/opinion/2007-06/26/content_1215148.htm
  142. Lieberthal, K., & Wang, J. (2012, March). John L. Thornton China Center Monograph Series: Vol. 4. Addressing US-China strategic distrust. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press.Google Scholar
  143. Lijphart, A. (1971). Comparative politics and the comparative method. The American Political Science Review, 65(3), 682–693.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  144. Louzek, M. (2011). The battle of methods in economics. The classical Methodenstreit – Menger vs. Schmoller. American Journal of Economics and Sociology, 70(2), 439–463.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  145. Macdonald, J. (2015). When globalization fails. The rise and fall of Pax Americana. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.Google Scholar
  146. Mackinder, H. J. (1919). Democratic ideals and reality. A study in the politics of reconstruction. London: Constable and Company Ltd.Google Scholar
  147. Mahan, A. Th. (1987 [1894]). The influence of sea power upon history 1660–1783. New York: Dover Publications, part 26–69.Google Scholar
  148. Mahbubani, K. (1997). An Asian-Pacific consensus. Foreign Affairs, 76(5), 149–158.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  149. Mahbubani, K. (2008). The new Asian hemisphere: The irresistible shift of global power to the East. New York: PublicAffairs PBG.Google Scholar
  150. Maher, R. (2011). The paradox of American unipolarity: Why the United States may be better off in a post-unipolar world. Orbis, 55(1), 53–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  151. Mahoney, J. (2003). Strategies of causal assessment in comparative historical analysis. In J. Mahoney & D. Rueschemeyer (Eds.), Comparative historical analysis in the social sciences (pp. 337–372). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  152. Mahoney, J., & Rueschemeyer, D. (2003). Comparative historical analysis. Achievements and agendas. In J. Mahoney & D. Rueschemeyer (Eds.), Comparative historical analysis in the social sciences (pp. 3–38). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  153. Mahoney, J., & Terrie, P. L. (2010). Comparative-historical analysis. In J. M. Box-Steffensmeier, H. E. Brady, & D. Collier (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of political methodology (pp. 737–755). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  154. Mardell, M. (2012, November 18). US pivots, China bristles. BBC. Retrieved May 3, 2014, from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-20387131
  155. Marsh, K. (2014). Descending eagle: The 2014 quadrennial defense review & the decline of US power. Orbis, 58(4), 604–620.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  156. Maxwell, J. A. (2012). A realist approach for qualitative research (pp. 1–67). Los Angeles: Sage.Google Scholar
  157. McKeown, T. J. (2004). Case studies and the limits of the quantitative worldview. In H. E. Brady & D. Collier (Eds.), Rethinking social inquiry. Diverse tools, shared standards (pp. 139–167). Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
  158. Mearsheimer, J. J. (2001). The tragedy of great power politics. New York: W.W. Norton.Google Scholar
  159. Mearsheimer, J. J. (2005a, January/February). Better to be godzilla than bambi. Foreign Policy, No. 146, pp. 47–48.Google Scholar
  160. Mearsheimer, J. J. (2005b, January/February). Showing the United States the door. Foreign Policy, No. 146, p. 49.Google Scholar
  161. Mearsheimer, J. J. (2005c, January/February). It’s not a pretty picture. Foreign Policy, No. 146, p. 50.Google Scholar
  162. Mearsheimer, J. J. (2006). China’s unpeaceful rise. Current History, 105(690), 160–162.Google Scholar
  163. Mearsheimer, J. J. (2014). Why the Ukraine crisis is the west’s fault. The liberal delusions that provoked Putin. Foreign Affairs, 93(5), 1–12.Google Scholar
  164. Medeiros, E. S. (2005). Strategic hedging and the future of Asia-Pacific stability. Washington Quarterly, 29(1), 145–167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  165. Mendis, P. (2014). Peaceful war. How the Chinese dream and the American destiny create a Pacific new world order. New York: University Press of America.Google Scholar
  166. Meyers, R. (1993). Grundbegriffe, Strukturen und theoretische Perspektiven der internationalen Beziehungen. In Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung (BpB) (Ed.), Grundwissen Politik (pp. 229–334). Bonn: BpB.Google Scholar
  167. Meyers, R. (2010). Internationale B., Internationale Politik. In D. Nohlen & R.-O. Schultze (Eds.), Lexikon der Politikwissenschaften. Theorien, Methoden, Begriffe. Band 1: A-M. Munich: Beck, pp. 427–437.Google Scholar
  168. Miller, B. (2011). Making measures capture concepts: Tools for securing correspondence between theoretical ideas and observations. In T. Gschwend & F. Schimmelfennig (Eds.), Research design in political science. How to practice what they preach (pp. 83–102). Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  169. Ming, L. (2005). The rise of China and the demise of the capitalist world-economy: Exploring historic possibilities in the 21st century. Science & Society, 69(3), 420–448.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  170. Morimoto, S. (1998). Chinese military power in Asia: A Japanese perspective. In J. D. Pollack & R. H. Yang (Eds.), In China’s shadow. Regional perspectives on Chinese foreign policy and military development. RAND Report, pp. 37–49.Google Scholar
  171. Morris, I. (2010). Why the west rules – for now. The patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.Google Scholar
  172. Morrison, W. M. (2013, December 17). China’s economic rise: History, trends, challenges, and implications for the United States. CRS Report for Congress, No. RL33534. Retrieved September 10, 2014, from http://fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL33534.pdf
  173. Mowery, D. C., & Simcoe, T. (2002). Is the internet a US invention? An economic and technological history of computer networking. Research Policy, 31(8–9), 1369–1387.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  174. N.N. (2014, August 23). What China wants. The Economist, p. 9.Google Scholar
  175. Nanto, D. K., & Chanlett-Avery, E. (2006). The rise of China and its effects on Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea: U.S. Policy choices. CRS Report for Congress RL 32882. Washington, DC: Library of Congress.Google Scholar
  176. Narlikar, A. (2010). New powers. How to become one and how to manage them. London: Hurst & Company.Google Scholar
  177. National Intelligence Council. (2008). Global trends 2025: A transformed world. Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  178. Nye, J. S. (2004). Soft power. The means to success in world politics. New York: PublicAffairs books.Google Scholar
  179. Obama, B. (2009, November 14). Remarks by President Barack Obama at Suntory Hall (Tokyo, Japan). Retrieved January 8, 2010, from http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/remarks-president-barack-obama-suntory-hall
  180. Oertel, J. (2014). China and the United Nations. Chinese UN policy in the areas of peace and development in the era of Hu Jintao. Baden-Baden: Nomos & Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
  181. Office of the Secretary of Defence. (2014). Military and security developments involving the People’ Republic of China. Annual Report to Congress. Retrieved September 17, 2014, from http://www.defense.gov/pubs/2014_DoD_China_Report.pdf
  182. Organski, A. F. K. (1968). World politics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.Google Scholar
  183. Ormston, R., Spencer, L., Barnard, M., & Snape, D. (2014). The foundations of qualitative research. In J. Ritchie, J. Lewis, C. McNaughton Nicholls, & R. Ormston (Eds.), Qualitative research practice. A guide for social science students and researchers (pp. 1–25). Los Angeles: Sage.Google Scholar
  184. Panikkar, K. M. (1959). Asia and western dominance: A survey of the Vasco da Gama epoch of Asian history, 1498–1945. London: George Allen and Unwin.Google Scholar
  185. Pape, R. A. (2005). Soft balancing against the United States. International Security, 30(1), 7–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  186. Pape, R. A. (2009, January/February). Empire falls. The National Interest, pp. 21–34.Google Scholar
  187. Patomäki, H. (2000). After postpositivism? The promises of critical realism. International Studies Quarterly, 44(2), 213–237.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  188. Patton, M. (2016, April 28). US Government deficit is rising again. Forbes. Retrieved May 12, 2016, from http://www.forbes.com/sites/mikepatton/2016/04/28/u-s-government-deficit-is-rising-again/#6ebd50547146
  189. Perlo-Freeman, S., & Solmirano, C. (2014, April). Trends in world military expenditure, 2013. SIPRI Fact Sheet.Google Scholar
  190. Pevehouse, J. C., & Brozek, J. D. (2010). Time-series analysis. In J. M. Box-Steffensmeier, H. E. Brady, & D. Collier (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of political methodology (pp. 456–474). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  191. Pew Research. (2013a, July 18). United States and China: The image of the globe’s two superpowers. Pew Research Global Attitudes Project. Retrieved November 24, 2014, from http://www.pewglobal.org/2013/07/18/united-states-and-china-the-image-of-the-globes-two-superpowers/
  192. Pew Research. (2013b, July 18). World’s leading economic power. Pew Research Global Attitudes Project. Retrieved November 24, 2014, from http://www.pewglobal.org/2013/07/18/worlds-leading-economic-power/
  193. Pew Research. (2013c, July 23). How developing nations see the economy, China, the US. Pew Research Global Attitudes Project. Retrieved November 24, 2014, from http://www.pewglobal.org/2013/07/23/how-developing-nations-see-the-economy-china-the-u-s/
  194. Pillsbury, M. (2015). The hundred-year marathon. China’s secret strategy to replace America as the global superpower. New York: Henry Holt and Company.Google Scholar
  195. Pollack, J. D. (1998). Asian-Pacific responses to a rising China. In J. D. Pollack & R. H. Yang (Eds.), In China’s shadow. Regional perspectives on Chinese foreign policy and military development. RAND Report, pp. 1–9.Google Scholar
  196. Rathke, J. (2011). Achieving comparability of secondary data. In T. Gschwend & F. Schimmelfennig (Eds.), Research design in political science. How to practice what they preach (pp. 103–124). Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  197. Rauch, C. (2014). Das Konzept des friedlichen Machtübergangs. Die Machtübergangstheorie und der weltpolitische Aufstieg Indiens. Baden-Baden: Nomos.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  198. Reuters. (2012, October 23). Debating China. U.S. President Barack Obama and Republican rival Mitt Romney outline China policy in final Presidential debate. Retrieved December 18, 2012, from http://www.reuters.com/video/2012/10/23/debating-china?videoId=238602596
  199. Rice, C. (2000). Campaign 2000: Promoting the nation interest. Foreign Affairs, 79(1), 45–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  200. Rihoux, B. (2010). Case-oriented configurational research: Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA), fuzzy sets, and related techniques. In J. M. Box-Steffensmeier, H. E. Brady, & D. Collier (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of political methodology (pp. 722–736). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  201. Ritchie, J., & Ormston, R. (2014). The applications of qualitative methods to social research. In J. Ritchie, J. Lewis, C. McNaughton Nicholls, & R. Ormston (Eds.), Qualitative research practice. A guide for social science students and researchers (pp. 27–46). Los Angeles: Sage.Google Scholar
  202. Roach, S. S. (2009). The next Asia. Opportunities and challenges for a new globalization. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.Google Scholar
  203. Roach, S. S. (2014). Unbalance. The codependency of America and China. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  204. Rosecrance, R. (2006). Power and international relations: The rise of China and its effects. International Studies Perspectives, 7(1), 31–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  205. Ross, R. S. (2010). The rise of Chinese power and the implications for the regional security order. Orbis, 54(4), 525–545.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  206. Roy, D. (1994). Hegemon on the horizon? China’s threat to East Asian security. International Security, 19(1), 149–168.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  207. Roy, D. (1996). The ‘China threat’ issue: Major arguments. Asian Survey, 36(8), 758–771.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  208. Roy, D. (2013). Return of the dragon. Rising China and regional security. New York: Columbia University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  209. Rudd, K. (2013). Beyond the pivot. A new road map for US-Chinese relations. Foreign Affairs, 92(2), 9–15.Google Scholar
  210. Sally, R. (2010). The shift to the East. Economic Affairs, 30(3), 94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  211. Samuelson, R. J. (2014, May 14). Economic power shifting in China’s favor. The Washington Post. Retrieved September 9, 2014, from http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/robert-samuelson-economic-power-shifting-in-chinas-favor/2014/05/14/bee0d608-daf3-11e3-b745-87d39690c5c0_story.html
  212. Schattenberg, S. (2011). Das Ende der Sowjetunion in der Historiographie. Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte (Vol. 49–50). Retrieved November 17, 2014, from http://www.bpb.de/apuz/59630/das-ende-der-sowjetunion-in-der-historiographie?p=all
  213. Schmidt, B. C. (2013). On the history and historiography of international relations. In W. Carlsnaes, T. Risse, & B. A. Simmons (Eds.), Handbook of international relations (pp. 3–28). Los Angeles: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  214. Schoen, D. E., & Kaylan, M. (2014). The Russia-China axis. The new cold war and America’s crisis of leadership. New York: Encounter Books.Google Scholar
  215. Schweller, R. L., & Pu, X. (2011). After unipolarity. China’s visions of international order in an era of US decline. International Security, 36(1), 41–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  216. Shambaugh, D. (2005a). China engages Asia. Reshaping the regional order. International Security, 29(3), 64–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  217. Shambaugh, D. (2005b). The new strategic triangle: US and European reactions to China’s rise. The Washington Quarterly, 28(3), 7–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  218. Shambaugh, D. (2013). China goes global. The partial power. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  219. Sil, R., & Katzenstein, P. J. (2010). Beyond paradigms. Analytical eclecticism in the study of world politics. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  220. Skocpol, T. (2003). Doubly engaged social science. The promise of comparative historical analysis. In J. Mahoney & D. Rueschemeyer (Eds.), Comparative historical analysis in the social sciences (pp. 407–428). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  221. Sloan, E. (2011). US-China military and security developments. International Journal, 66(2), 265–283.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  222. Smith, M. A. (2012). Power in the changing global order. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  223. Spencer, L., Ritchie, J., O’Connor, W., Morrell, G., & Ormston, R. (2014). Analysis in practice. In J. Ritchie, J. Lewis, C. McNaughton Nicholls, & R. Ormston (Eds.), Qualitative research practice. A guide for social science students and researchers (pp. 295–345). Los Angeles: Sage.Google Scholar
  224. Spindler, M., & Schieder, S. (2014). Theory in international relations. In S. Schieder & M. Spindler (Eds.), Theories of international relations (pp. 1–21). Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  225. Starr, B. (2013, December 13). US, Chinese warships come dangerously close. CNN. Retrieved September 21, 2015, from http://edition.cnn.com/2013/12/13/politics/us-china-confrontation/
  226. Steyn, M. (2011). After America. Washington, DC: Regnery Publishing.Google Scholar
  227. Stratfor. (2010). China: Power and perils. Austin, TX: Stratfor Press.Google Scholar
  228. Sutter, R. G. (2006). China’s rise: Implications for US leadership in Asia. Policy Studies, No. 21. East-West Center, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  229. Sutter, R. G. (2014). China and America: The great divergence? Orbis, 58(3), 358–377.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  230. Suzuki, S. (2009). Chinese soft power, insecurity studies, myopia and fantasy. Third World Quarterly, 30(4), 779–793.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  231. Tammen, R. L., Kugler, J., Lemke, D., Abdollahian, M. A., Asharabati, C., Efird, B., et al. (2000). Power transitions: Strategies for the 21st century. Washington, DC: CGPress.Google Scholar
  232. Tellis, A. J. (2013). No escape: Managing the enduring reality of nuclear weapons. In A. J. Tellis, A. M. Denmark, & T. Tanner (Eds.), Strategic Asia 2013–14. Asia in the second nuclear age (pp. 3–32). Seattle, WA: National Bureau of Asian Research.Google Scholar
  233. Thayer, C. (2013, December 17). USS cowpens incident reveals strategic mistrust between US and China. The Diplomat. Retrieved September 21, 2015, from http://thediplomat.com/2013/12/uss-cowpens-incident-reveals-strategic-mistrust-between-u-s-and-china/
  234. Thompson, K. W., & Clinton, W. D. (2005). Foreword. The continuing relevance of politics among nations. In H. Morgenthau (Ed.), Politics among nations. The struggle for power and peace (pp. xvii–xxxix). New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  235. Tselichtchev, I. (2012). China versus the West. The global power shift of the 21st century (pp. 81–94). Singapore: Wiley.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  236. Tselichtchev, I., & Debroux, P. (2009). Asia’s turning point. An introduction to Asia’s dynamic economies at the dawn of the new century. Singapore: Wiley.Google Scholar
  237. Twining, D. (2010). Democratic partnership in Asia. Policy Review, October/November, 55–70.Google Scholar
  238. Unz, R. (2012, April 17). China’s rise, America’s fall. Which superpower is more threatened by its ‘extractive elites’? The American Conservative. Retrieved February 6, 2015, from http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/chinas-rise-americas-fall/
  239. US Treasury. (2010). Debt position and activity report. Report for January 2010, Retrieved February 25, 2015, from http://www.treasurydirect.gov/govt/reports/pd/pd_debtposactrpt_1001.pdf
  240. US Treasury. (2016). Debt position and activity report. Report for June 2016. Retrieved September 13, 2016, from https://www.treasurydirect.gov/govt/reports/pd/pd_debtposactrpt_0616.pdf
  241. van der Pijl, K. (2006). Global rivalries. From the cold war to Iraq. London: Pluto Press.Google Scholar
  242. Vaughn, B., & Morrison, W. M. (2006, April 4). China-Southeast Asia relations: Trends, issues, and implications for the United States. CRS Report for Congress. Retrieved February 8, 2014, from https://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL32688.pdf
  243. von Wright, G. H. (2000). Erklären und Verstehen. Berlin: Philosophische Verlagsanstalt.Google Scholar
  244. Vromen, A. (2010). Debating methods: Rediscovering qualitative approaches. In D. Marsh & G. Stoker (Eds.), Theory and methods in political science (pp. 249–266). Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  245. Wagener, M. (2011). Die aufgeschobene Konfrontation: Warum die USA mit China (noch) kooperieren. Internationale Politik, 2, 112–119.Google Scholar
  246. Waldron, A. (2005). The rise of China: Military and political implications. Review of International Studies, 31(4), 715–733.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  247. Waldron, A. (2014). China’s ‘peaceful rise’ enters turbulence. Orbis, 58(2), 164–181.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  248. Wang, D. (2003). The discourse of unequal treaties in modern China. Pacific Affairs, 76(3), 399–425.Google Scholar
  249. Wang, J. (2009). China’s peaceful rise: A comparative study. EAI Fellows Program Working Paper, No. 19. Retrieved September 11, 2014, from http://www.eai.or.kr/data/bbs/eng_report/2009052017544710.pdf
  250. Watson Institute. (2015). Costs of war. Retrieved February 25, 2015, from http://costsofwar.org
  251. White, H. (2005). The limits of optimism: Australia’s future between Washington and Beijing. Australian Journal of International Affairs, 59(4), 469–480.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  252. White, H. (2010, September). Power shift. Australia’s future between Washington and Beijing. Quarterly Essay, No. 39.Google Scholar
  253. White, H. (2013). The new security order. An epochal change. East Asia Forum Quarterly, 5(2), 8–9.Google Scholar
  254. Wolf, R. (2014). Rising powers, status ambitions, and the need to reassure: What China could learn from imperial Germany’s failures. The Chinese Journal of International Politics, 7(2), 185–219.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  255. World Bank. (2015). GDP per capita, PPP (current international $). International Comparison Program Database. Retrieved February 6, 2015, from http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.PCAP.PP.CD
  256. Yahuda, M. (2011). The international politics of the Asia-Pacific. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  257. Yan, X. (2001). The rise of China in Chinese eyes. Journal of Contemporary China, 10(26), 33–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  258. Yan, X. (2006). The rise of China and its power status. Chinese Journal of International Politics, 1(1), 5–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  259. Yin, R. K. (2009). Case study research. Design and methods. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  260. Yong, D., & Moore, T. G. (2004). China views globalization: Toward a new great-power politics? The Washington Quarterly, 27(3), 117–136.Google Scholar
  261. Younglai, R. (2011, February 28). Economist list US budget deficit as no. 1 worry. Reuters. Retrieved February 25, 2014, from http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/02/28/us-usa-economy-survey-idUSTRE71R1LF20110228
  262. Yuen, F. K. (2001). Negotiating ‘order’ during power transitions. In C. A. Kupchan, E. Adler, J.-M. Couicaud, & F. K. Yuen (Eds.), Power in transition: The peaceful change of international order (pp. 34–67). Tokyo: United Nations University Press.Google Scholar
  263. Zakaria, F. (1999). From wealth to power. The unusual origins of America’s world role. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  264. Zakaria, F. (2008). The future of American power. How America can survive the rise of the rest. Foreign Affairs, 87(3), 18–43.Google Scholar
  265. Zakheim, D. S. (2014). Facing the challenges of the 21st century. Orbis, 58(1), 8–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  266. Zartman, I. W. (2009). The quest for order in world politics. In I. W. Zartman (Ed.), Imbalance of power. US hegemony and international order (pp. 1–23). Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner.Google Scholar
  267. Zhang, W.-W. (2004). The implications of the rise of China. Foresight, 6(4), 223–226.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  268. Zheng, W. (2012). Never forget national humiliation. Historical memory in Chinese politics and foreign relations. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  269. Zweig, D., & Bi, J. (2005). China’s global hunt for energy. Foreign Affairs, 84(5), 25–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Enrico Fels
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Global StudiesUniversity of BonnBonnGermany

Personalised recommendations