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The Southern African Power Pool: An Electrifying Project with Untapped Potential

  • Johannes MuntschickEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter turns to infrastructure and gives an outstanding analysis of regional electricity cooperation in the SADC within the framework of the Southern African Power Pool (SAPP). The author illustrates the regional power imbalances in terms of national electricity generation and consumption which fuel the SADC countries’ demand for a regional electricity market and an interconnected regional power grid. It becomes clear that the SAPP’s institutional design is strongly influenced by South Africa as the hub of the existing power network and largest electricity producer. Influence by external actors is supportive of regional electricity cooperation since the EU provides funding for the SAPP. This chapter concludes that the regional electricity market and grid expansion show satisfying results but that the SAPP is still underperforming.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political SciencesJohannes Gutenberg University of MainzMainzGermany

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