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Conclusions and Recommendations for Those Outside or Inside the “Global Village”

  • Aleardo Zaccheo
  • Eleonora Palmaccio
  • Morgan Venable
  • Isabella Locarnini-Sciaroni
  • Salvatore Parisi
Chapter

Abstract

In the last century humans have contracted into a “global village,” and although more people have gained access to improved drinking water, and even if children mortality caused diarrheal diseases has steadily decreased in the last two decades, food safety remains “a privilege of the wealthy” because in many parts of the world achieving an adequate food supply takes the precedence over food safety. Pathogens can travel around the globe faster than ever before, and the focus on food safety has changed over time. Human environmental pressure on the planet’s ecosystems has escalated to an unprecedented level, but our ability to predict the responses of microbes to ongoing changes are still very limited. International regulations and recommendation for the food trade have been established, but their interpretation and application still differ markedly among and within countries. Consumers are the ultimate decision makers on their food safety, and sound food safety education should start early in everyone’s lives.

Keywords

Global village Global food trade Global village Diarrheal diseases Burden Epidemiology Algal blooms Cyanobacteria Aflatoxins Infectious agents Toxicogenic agents Emerging pathogens Unspecified agents Water and food safety The five keys to food safety The Codex Alimentarius HACCP HARPC 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aleardo Zaccheo
    • 1
  • Eleonora Palmaccio
    • 1
  • Morgan Venable
    • 2
  • Isabella Locarnini-Sciaroni
    • 3
  • Salvatore Parisi
    • 4
  1. 1.bioethica food safety engineering sagl.Lugano-PregassonaSwitzerland
  2. 2.Consultant Registered DieticianMedegliaSwitzerland
  3. 3.Salumificio Sciaroni S.A.SementinaSwitzerland
  4. 4.Industrial ConsultantPalermoItaly

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