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Protection and Conservation of Archaeological Heritage in Malaysia: Issues and Challenges

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Part of the One World Archaeology book series (WORLDARCH)

Abstract

Archaeologists and authorities such as the Department of National Heritage and Museums in Malaysia are always racing against time to protect archaeological heritage before it is damaged or destroyed by the rapid pace of economic development in the country. Moreover, recent interest in archaeological tourism has created new challenges to safeguarding Malaysia’s archaeological heritage. Finally, limited skilled experts and financial resources have constrained the ability of Malaysia’s museums to properly store and conserve artifacts. This chapter first presents some of these challenges, using specific case studies of Lenggong Valley in Perak, which was recently inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List, and the archaeology-rich areas in the Bujang Valley, Kedah and Malaysian Borneo. It then describes the legislative context within which heritage management operates in Malaysia, and considers further steps that could be taken by governments and other stakeholders to enhance the preservation of Malaysian archaeological heritage.

Keywords

Heritage Archaeology Malaysia Lenggong Valley Bujang Valley 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Global Archaeological ResearchUniversiti Sains MalaysiaPenangMalaysia

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