Advertisement

Post Trafficking Victims in Mexico and Their Reintegration Process: An Analysis of the Government’s Response

  • Arun Kumar AcharyaEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter presents a detailed description of the government’s response on the reintegration process of trafficking victims. The reintegration of trafficked victims is a central theme on protection of human rights. The government of Mexico has signed and ratified all the important international and regional conventions promoted by international and regional agencies such as the Organization of American States. In 2012, Mexico adopted new anti trafficking law, which was also reformed in 2014. During the last three years, with the cooperation of civil society, the Mexican government has tried to develop effective programs on the reintegration process of human trafficking victims. A lack of coordination at different government levels, including insufficient funding and a poor implementation of the law on trafficking, has weakened the government’s response on prevention, prosecution, and protection of human trafficking victims in the country.

Keywords

Human trafficking Anti-trafficking laws Reintegration Government’s response Mexico 

References

  1. Acharya, A. (2010). Feminization of migration and trafficking of women in Mexico. Review of Research and Social Intervention, 30, 19–38.Google Scholar
  2. Acharya, A. K., & Bryson, C. J. (2014). Trafficking of women and vulnerability to HIV/STI infection in urban Mexico. Genus, 70(2–3). doi:  10.4402/genus-603.
  3. Azaola, E. (1998). Prostitución infantil. Salud, IV Informe sobre los derechos y la situación de la infancia en México (pp. 297–315). México: Colectivo Mexicano de Apoyo a la Niñez.Google Scholar
  4. Azaola, E., & Estes, R. J. (Eds.). (2003). La Infancia como Mercancía Sexual: Mexico, Canada, Estados Unidos (1st ed.). Mexico: Siglo XXI.Google Scholar
  5. Cámara de Diputados del H. Congreso de la Unión (2012). Ley General Para Prevenir, Sancionar y Erradicar los Delitos en Materia de Trata de Personas y Para la Protección y Asistencia a las Víctimas de estos Delitos. Nueva Ley DOF 14-06-2012, Government of Mexico. Retrieved June 16, 2015, from http://www.inmujeres.gob.mx/inmujeres/images/stories/normateca/legislacion2014/lgpsedmtp.pdf
  6. Cámara de Diputados del H. Congreso de la Unión (2014). Ley General Para Prevenir, Sancionar y Erradicar los Delitos en Materia de Trata de Personas y Para la Protección y Asistencia a las Víctimas de estos Delitos. Última Reforma DOF 19-03-2014, Government of Mexico. Retrieved June 16, 2015, from http://www.diputados.gob.mx/LeyesBiblio/pdf/LGPSEDMTP.pdf
  7. COHA (Council on Hemispheric Affairs) (2009). Modern Day Slavery in Mexico and the United States. December 21, 1250 Connecticut Ave, N.W., Suite 1C Washington, D.C. Retrieved June 16, 2015, from http://www.coha.org/modern-day-slavery-in-mexico-and-the-united-states/
  8. Comisión Nacional de los Derechos Humanos (CNDH). (2013). Diagnóstico sobre la Situación de la Trata de Personas en México, Primera edición: diciembre, ISBN: 978-607-729-047-6, Comisión Nacional de los Derechos Humanos, Periférico Sur 3469, México, D.F. Retrieved June 16, 2015, from http://www.senado.gob.mx/comisiones/trata_personas/docs/Diagnostico_Trata.pdf.
  9. Crawford, M., & Kaufman, M. R. (2008). Sex trafficking in Nepal: Survivor characteristics long term outcomes. Violence Against Women, 14(8).Google Scholar
  10. Esteinou, R. (2011). Selling bodies and sexual exploitation: Prostitution in Mexico. In D. Rochelle et al. (Eds.), Global perspectives on prostitution and sex trafficking: Europe, Latin America, North America and Global. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
  11. Franco, R. (1973). La prostitución. Diana: México.Google Scholar
  12. Goldenberg, S. M., Rangel, G., Vera, A., Patterson, T. L., Abramovitz, D., Silverman, J. G., Raj, A., & Strathdee, S. A. (2012). Exploring the impact of underage sex work among female sex workers in two Mexico-US border cities. AIDS Behaviours, 16(4), 969–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. González, R. (2003). Violencia contra las mujeres deja un millón de víctimas anuales en México. Mexico: CIMAC. Retrieved April 14, 2015, from http://www.cimacnoticias.com.mx/node/30338.Google Scholar
  14. International Labour Organization (ILO) (2005). A global alliance against forced labor. International Labour Conference, 93rd Session, International Labor Office, Geneva.Google Scholar
  15. Kara, S. (2009). Sex trafficking: Inside the business of Modern Slavery. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Kempadoo, K., & Doezema, J. (Eds.). (1998). Global sex workers: Rights, resistance and redefinition. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  17. Montalvo, T. L. (2014, November 26). Víctimas de trata en México se duplican en el último año: la mayoría son mujeres y niñas, Animal Político. Retrieved June 16, 2015, from http://www.animalpolitico.com/2014/11/victimas-de-trata-en-mexico-se-duplican-en-el-ultimo-ano-la-mayoria-sonmujeres-y-ninas/.
  18. Monroy, P. (2010). México: pasividad ante explotación sexual infantil. Septiembre, México DF: Contralínea. Retrieved October 7, 2015, from http://contralinea.info/archivo-revista/index.php/2010/09/05/mexico-pasividad-ante-explotacion-sexual-infantil/.Google Scholar
  19. ONC (Observatorio nacional ciudadano de seguridad, justicia y legalidad). (2014). Estadística sobre la eficiencia en el combate a la trata de personas en México: un ejercicio de acceso a la información 2010–2013. México: Observatorio nacional ciudadano de seguridad, justicia y legalidad.Google Scholar
  20. Raphael, J., & Shapiro, D. L. (2004). Violence in indoor and outdoor prostitution venues. Violence Against Women, 10(2), 126–139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Ríos De La Torre, G. (1991). La prostitución femenina en la ciudad de México durante el Porfirismo. Master thesis. México, UNAM.Google Scholar
  22. Ruíz Torres, M. A. (2003). La Explotación sexual de Niños en Dos Ciudades Turísticas: Cancún y Acapulco. In E. Azaola, & J. R. Estes (Eds.), La Infancia como Mercancía Sexual: Mexico, Canada, Estados Unidos. Mexico: Siglo XXI.Google Scholar
  23. Saxena, P. M., Patel, V. S., Maj, M., Maselko, J., Phillips, M. R., & Rahman, A. (2007). No health without mental health. Lancet, 370(9590), 859–877.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Shelley, L. (2010). Human trafficking: A global perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. United States Department of State. (2001). The trafficking in persons report-2001. Washington DC: U.S. Department of State. Retrieved April 3, 2015, from http://www.state.gov/g/tip/rls/tiprpt/2001/.Google Scholar
  26. United States Department of State. (2015). The trafficking in persons report-2015. Washington DC: U.S. Department of State. Retrieved April 3, 2015, from http://www.state.gov/g/tip/rls/tiprpt/2015/.Google Scholar
  27. UNODC. (2014). Global report on trafficking in persons 2014. Global report on trafficking in persons unit, research and trend analysis branch division for policy analysis and public affairs. Vienna: United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.Google Scholar
  28. Wijers, M. (2015). Purity, victimhood and agency: Fifteen years of the UN trafficking protocol. Anti-Trafficking Review, 4, 56–79.Google Scholar
  29. Zimmerman, C., Hossain, M., Yun, K., Gajdadziev, V., Guzun, N., Tchomarova, M., Ciarrocchi, R. A., Johansson, A., Kefurtova, A., Scodanibbio, S., Motus, M. N., Roche, B., Morison, L., & Watts, C. (2008). The health of trafficked women: A survey of women entering post-trafficking services in Europe. American Journal of Public Health, 98(1), 55–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo LeónNuevo LeónMexico

Personalised recommendations