Quantification in Nungon

Chapter
Part of the Studies in Linguistics and Philosophy book series (SLAP, volume 97)

Abstract

After presenting some basic genetic, historical and typological information about Nungon, this chapter outlines the quantification patterns it expresses. It illustrates various semantic types of quantifiers, such as generalized existential, generalized universal, proportional, definite and partitive which are defined in the Quantifier Questionnaire in chapter “The Quantifier Questionnaire”. It partitions the expression of the semantic types into morpho-syntactic classes: Adverbial type quantifiers and Nominal (or Determiner) type quantifiers. For the various semantic and morpho-syntactic types of quantifiers it also distinguishes syntactically simple and syntactically complex quantifiers, as well as issues of distributivity and scope interaction, classifiers and measure expressions, and existential constructions. The chapter describes structural properties of determiners and quantified noun phrases in Nungon, both in terms of internal structure (morphological or syntactic) and distribution.

Keywords

Nungon Quantification patterns Semantic Morpho-syntactic Quantifiers Classifiers Determiners Quantified noun phrases 

Abbreviations

ADEM

adverbial demonstrative

ADJ

adjectivizer

ALT

alternative question

AUTOREFL

autoreflexive

BEN

benefactive

COMIT

comitative

COMPL

completive

DEP

dependent verb

DESID

desiderative

DS

different-subject

DU

dual

DUB

dubitative

EMPH

emphatic

FOC

focus

GEN

genitive

IMM.IMP

immediate imperative

INTENS

intensifier

IRR

irrealis

LDEM

local nominal demonstrative

LOC

locative

MV

medial verb

NDEM

NP-modifying demonstrative

NEAR

near distance

NEG

negative

NF

near future

NMZ

nominalizer

NP

near past

NSG

non-singular: more than one

O

object

PERF

perfect aspect

PL

plural: more than two

PRES

present

PRO

personal pronoun

PROB

probable

POSS

possessive

RED

reduplicated

REL

relativizer

RESTR

restrictive, exclusive

RF

remote future

RP

remote past

SEMBL

semblance

SG

singular

SPEC

specifier

SUB

subordinate

TOP

topic

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, College of Asia and the PacificAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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