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Urban Regeneration

  • Simone SandholzEmail author
Chapter
Part of the The Urban Book Series book series (UBS)

Abstract

The focal areas of urban regeneration have changed profoundly over the last century. Current regeneration schemes are mostly dealing with inserting landmark buildings in historic surroundings which are upgraded and renovated in the course of the regeneration project, e.g. in popular waterfront developments. Today, there is a whole variety of urban regeneration scales, ranging from small-scale projects to upgrade historic urban cores to large scale and more economy-driven projects. Urban regeneration projects originated in the Euro-American region, but became popular on a global scale. Urban regeneration in emerging and developing countries underwent three phases, from a renovation and beautification phase to a preference of modernization which with a focus on traffic infrastructure and verticalization and only little consideration of the centres. Currently urban centres are reconsidered and redefined as important components of an often fragmented city. Urban heritage and its contribution to urban sustainability is of growing importance in urban development. Regeneration does not necessarily consider historic buildings or intangible heritage, but increasingly their potential, importance and value for the urban population is recognized, including developing and emerging countries.

Keywords

Urban renewal Regeneration schemes 

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© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of GeographyUniversity of InnsbruckInnsbruckAustria

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