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Continuity and Change as Children Start School

  • Sue DockettEmail author
  • Jóhanna Einarsdóttir
Chapter
Part of the International Perspectives on Early Childhood Education and Development book series (CHILD, volume 16)

Abstract

While there has been much discussion – theoretically, conceptually and practically – about addressing discontinuity and promoting continuity at times of educational transition, less attention has been given to examining what is meant by continuity and the rationale for its promotion. One of the implications of the focus on continuity has been less attention to the notions of change in transitions and the importance of balancing both continuity and change for those involved. In this chapter, we consider current positions and debates around continuity and change in educational transitions, particularly the transition to primary school. We draw on a range of theoretical and conceptual perspectives to explore these.

Keywords

Early Childhood Early Childhood Education School Readiness Professional Relationship Meeting Place 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Charles Sturt UniversityAlburyAustralia
  2. 2.University of IcelandReykjavikIceland

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