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Hedonia, Eudaimonia, and Meaning: Me Versus Us; Fleeting Versus Enduring

  • Michael F. StegerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the International Handbooks of Quality-of-Life book series (IHQL)

Abstract

Psychology’s recent interest in the philosophical debate regarding hedonia and eudaimonia has added richness to conceptualizations of flourishing, but this chapter argues that a more psychological model of hedonia and eudaimonia would free the field from “conceptual confusion” and stimulate new research approaches. This chapter presents a model wherein hedonia is distinguished from eudaimonia in that hedonia is marked by self-centered interest in immediate gratification and eudaimonia is marked by more collectively-oriented interest in enduring effort and contribution. This new model is linked to a dual process model of happiness and discussed in the context of psychological views on meaning in life.

Keywords

Happiness Wellbeing Eudaimonia Meaning 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Colorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA
  2. 2.North-West UniversityVanderbijlparkSouth Africa

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