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Structural Reforms in European Higher Education: Concluding Reflections

  • Harry de BoerEmail author
  • Jon File
  • Jeroen Huisman
  • Marco Seeber
  • Martina Vukasovic
  • Don F. Westerheijden
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Global Higher Education book series (PSGHE)

Abstract

In this chapter, we will first provide a cross-case analysis, followed by the identification of critical elements of higher education reform, presented by policy stage. In doing so, we highlight the importance of the context in which these reforms unfold. We will conclude the chapter by offering a more general reflection on important aspects of (higher education) policy analysis.

Keywords

High Education High Education Institution Policy Process High Education System Policy Design 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harry de Boer
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jon File
    • 1
  • Jeroen Huisman
    • 2
  • Marco Seeber
    • 2
  • Martina Vukasovic
    • 2
  • Don F. Westerheijden
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TwenteEnschedeThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Ghent UniversityGhentBelgium

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