Advertisement

Introduction

  • Madeline Bassnett
Chapter
Part of the Early Modern Literature in History book series (EMLH)

Abstract

This chapter introduces the relationship between food exchange and women’s governance through an examination of the early modern concepts of providence and physiology, and through a discussion of historical and theoretical concepts of gift-giving. In drawing our attention to food-related practices such as hospitality, gift-giving, nursing, and charity, early modern women’s writing establishes these practices as contributing not only to the traditional and informal arts of local administration, but also to the establishment of national and transnational religious and political networks.

Keywords

Food Exchange Gift Exchange Local Estate Food Practice Political Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Bibliography

  1. Dawson, Thomas. 1587. The good huswifes Iewell. London.Google Scholar
  2. ———. 1597. The Second part of the good Hus-wiues Iewell. London.Google Scholar
  3. ———. 1596. The Queenes Maiesties Proclamation, 1. For obseruation of former orders against Ingrossers, & Regraters of Corne…4. And a prohibition to men of hospitalitie from remoouing from their habitation in the time of dearth…and no inhabitant to depart from the Sea coast. London.Google Scholar
  4. Fitzherbert, John. 1979. Fitzharberts Booke of Husbandrie, 1598 facs. edn. Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum; Norwood, NJ: Walter J. Johnson.Google Scholar
  5. The Geneva Bible. 1969. 1560 fasc. edn. Madison and Milwaukee: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  6. Hentzner, Paul. 1757. A Journey into England. By Paul Hentzner, In the Year M.D.XC.VIII. ed. Horace Walpole. Twickenham.Google Scholar
  7. ———. 1615. The English Huswife. London.Google Scholar
  8. Markland, James Heywood. 1838. Instructions by Henry Percy, ninth Earl of Northumberland, to his son Algernon Percy, touching the management of his Estate, Officers, &c. written during his confinement to the Tower. Archaeologia 27: 306–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Milton, John. 2000. Paradise Lost, ed. John Leonard. London and New York: Penguin.Google Scholar
  10. Murrell, John. 1617. A Daily Exercise for Ladies and Gentlewomen. London.Google Scholar
  11. Partridge, John. 1584. The treasurie of commodious Conceits, & hidden Secrets. Commonly called The good Huswiues Closet. London.Google Scholar
  12. ———. 1588. The Widowes Treasure. London.Google Scholar
  13. ———. 1600. Delightes for Ladies. London.Google Scholar
  14. Tusser, Thomas. 1570. A hundreth good pointes of Husbandry, lately maried vnto a Hundreth good poynts of Huswifery. London.Google Scholar
  15. ———. 1573. Fiue hundreth points of good husbandry vnited to as many of good huswiferie. London.Google Scholar
  16. W.M. 1655. The Queens Closet Opened. London.Google Scholar
  17. Younger, William. 1617. The Nvrses Bosome: A Sermon within the Greene-Yard in Norwich. On the Guild-day when their Maior takes his Oath. London.Google Scholar
  18. Adrian, John M. 2011. Local Negotiations of English Nationhood, 1570–1680. Houndmills and New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Albala, Ken. 2002. Eating Right in the Renaissance. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  20. Andrea, Bernadette. 2007. Women and Islam in Early Modern English Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Appelbaum, Robert. 2006. Aguecheek’s Beef, Belch’s Hiccup, and Other Gastronomic Interjections: Literature, Culture, and Food Among the Early Moderns. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Archer, Jayne. 2002. The Queens’ Arcanum: Authority and Authorship in The Queens Closet Opened (1655). Renaissance Journal 1: 14–25.Google Scholar
  23. Arpad, Susan S. 1988. ‘Pretty Much to Suit Ourselves’: Midwestern Women Naming Experience through Domestic Arts. In Making the American Home: Middle-Class Women and Domestic Material Culture, 1840–1940, ed. Marilyn Ferris Motz and Pat Browne, 11–26. Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Popular Press.Google Scholar
  24. Ben-Amos, Ilana Krausman. 2008. The Culture of Giving: Informal Support and Gift-Exchange in Early Modern England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Broadway, Jan. 2006. ‘No historie so meete’: Gentry Culture and the Development of Local History in Elizabethan and Stuart England. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  26. ———. 2003. When Gossips Meet: Women, Family, and Neighbourhood in Early Modern England. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Chedgzoy, Kate. 2006. The Cultural Geographies of Early Modern Women’s Writing: Journeys Across Spaces and Times. Literature Compass 3(4): 884–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Crawford, Julie. 2014. Mediatrix: Women, Politics, and Literary Production in Early Modern England. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Davis, Natalie Zemon. 2000. The Gift in Sixteenth-Century France. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  30. Daybell, James, ed. 2004. Women and Politics in Early Modern England, 1450–1700. Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  31. Derrida, Jacques. 1992. Given Time: I. Counterfeit Money. Trans. Peggy Kamuf. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  32. DiMeo, Michelle, and Sara Pennell, eds. 2013. Reading and Writing Recipe Books 1550–1800. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Dowd, Michelle M. 2009. Women’s Work in Early Modern English Literature and Culture. Houndmills and New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Eales Jacqueline, and Andrew Hopper, eds. 2012. The County Community in Seventeenth Century England and Wales. Hatfield, Hertfordshire: University of Hertfordshire Press.Google Scholar
  35. Everitt, Alan. 1985. Landscape and Community in England. London and Ronceverte West Virginia: Hambledon.Google Scholar
  36. ———. 1966. The Community of Kent and the Great Rebellion 1640–60. Leicester: Leicester University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Ezell, Margaret J.M. 1987. The Patriarch’s Wife: Literary Evidence and the History of the Family. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.Google Scholar
  38. Field, Catherine. 2007. ‘Many hands hands’: Writing the Self in Early Modern Women’s Recipe Books. In Genre and Women’s Life Writing in Early Modern England, ed. Michelle M. Dowd and Julie A. Eckerle, 49–63. Aldershot: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  39. Fitzpatrick, Joan. 2007. Food in Shakespeare: Early Modern Dietaries and the Plays. Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  40. ———, ed. 2010. Renaissance Food from Rabelais to Shakespeare: Culinary Readings and Culinary Histories. Farnham and Burlington, VT: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  41. Godelier, Maurice. 1999. The Enigma of the Gift. Trans. Nora Scott. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  42. Goldstein, David B. 2011. Woolley’s Mouse: Early Modern Recipe Books and the Uses of Nature. In Ecofeminist Approaches to Early Modernity, ed. Jennifer Munroe and Rebecca Laroche, 105–27. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. ———. 2013. Eating and Ethics in Shakespeare’s England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  44. Gray, Catharine. 2007. Women Writers and Public Debate in 17th-Century Britain. Houndmills and New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. ———. 1990. Philip’s Phoenix: Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  46. Harris, Barbara J. 1990. Women and Politics in Early Tudor England. Historical Journal 33(2): 259–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. ———. 2002. English Aristocratic Women, 1450–1550: Marriage and Family, Property and Careers. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  48. ———. 2008. Food Gifts, the Household and the Politics of Exchange in Early Modern England. Past and Present 199: 41–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. ———. 2014. The Power of Gifts: Gift-Exchange in Early Modern England. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Hobby, Elaine. 1995. A Woman’s Best Setting Out is Silence: The Writings of Hannah Wolley. In Culture and Society in the Stuart Restoration: Literature, Drama, History, ed. Gerald MacLean, 179–200. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Jones, Norman L., and Daniel Woolf, eds. 2007. Local Identities in Late Medieval and Early Modern England. Houndmills and New York: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  52. Knoppers, Laura Lunger. 2011. Politicizing Domesticity from Henrietta Maria to Milton’s Eve. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  53. Korda, Natasha. 2002. Shakespeare’s Domestic Economies: Gender and Property in Early Modern England. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
  54. Laroche, Rebecca. 2009. Medical Authority and Englishwomen’s Herbal Texts, 1550–1650. Farnham and Burlington, VT: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  55. Lewis, Christopher. 1989. Particular Places: An Introduction to English Local History. London: British Library.Google Scholar
  56. Lupton, Julia. 2012. Thinking with Things: Hannah Woolley to Hannah Arendt. postmedieval 3: 63–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Mauss, Marcel. 1970. The Gift: Forms and Functions of Exchange in Archaic Societies. Trans. Ian Cunnison. London: Cohen and West.Google Scholar
  58. Mennell, Steven. 1985. All Manners of Food: Eating and Taste in England and France from the Middle Ages to the Present. Oxford and New York: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  59. Oldenburg, Scott. 2014. Alien Albion: Literature and Immigration in Early Modern England. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Osteen, Mark, ed. 2002. The Question of the Gift: Essays Across Disciplines. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  61. Paster, Gail Kern. 1993. The Body Embarrassed: Drama and the Disciplines of Shame in Early Modern England. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  62. Pennell, Sara. 2004. Perfecting Practice?: Women, Manuscript Recipes and Knowledge in Early Modern England. In Early Modern Women’s Manuscript Writing: Selected Papers from the Trinity/Trent Colloquium, ed. Victoria E. Burke and Jonathan Gibson, 237–55. Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  63. Phythian-Adams, Charles. 1987. Re-thinking English Local History. Leicester: Leicester University Press.Google Scholar
  64. Richards, Jennifer, and Alison Thorne, eds. 2007. Rhetoric, Women and Politics in Early Modern England. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  65. Schoenfeldt, Michael C. 1999. Bodies and Selves in Early Modern England: Physiology and Inwardness in Spenser, Shakespeare, Herbert and Milton. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  66. Schrift, Alan D., ed. 1997. The Logic of the Gift: Toward an Ethic of Generosity. New York and London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  67. Shuger, Debora K. 1990. Habits of Thought in the English Renaissance: Religion, Politics, and the Dominant Culture. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  68. Smith, Hilda L., ed. 1998. Women Writers and the Early Modern British Political Tradition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  69. ———. 2011. Women, Beauty and Power in Early Modern England: A Feminist Literary History. Houndmills and New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Suzuki, Mihoko. 2003. Subordinate Subjects: Gender, the Political Nation, and Literary Form in England, 1588–1688. Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  71. ———. 2007. Food in Early Modern England: Phases, Fads, Fashions 1500–1760. London: Hambledon Continuum.Google Scholar
  72. Thomas, Keith. 1980. Religion and the Decline of Magic. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  73. Tigner, Amy L. 2011. Preserving Nature in Hannah Woolley’s The Queen-Like Closet; or Rich Cabinet. In Ecofeminist Approaches to Early Modernity, ed. Jennifer Munroe and Rebecca Laroche, 129–49. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Wall, Wendy. 2002. Staging Domesticity: Household Work and English Identity in Early Modern Drama. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  75. ———. 2016. Recipes for Thought: Knowledge and Taste in the Early Modern English Kitchen. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. Walsham, Alexandra. 1999. Providence in Early Modern England. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  77. Weigall, Rachel. 1911. An Elizabethan Gentlewoman: The Journal of Lady Mildmay, circa 1570–1617 (unpublished). Quarterly Review 215: 119–38.Google Scholar
  78. Whittle, Jane, and Elizabeth Griffiths. 2012. Consumption and Gender in the Early Seventeenth-Century Household: The World of Alice Le Strange. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Wiesner-Hanks, Merry. 2011. Crossing Borders in Transnational Gender History. Journal of Global History 6(3): 357–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. ———. 2012. Early Modern Women and the Transnational Turn. Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 7: 191–202.Google Scholar
  81. Wilson, C. Anne. 2003 [1973]. Food and Drink in Britain: From the Stone Age to the 19th Century. Chicago: Academy Chicago.Google Scholar
  82. Worden, Blair. 1985. Providence and Politics in Cromwellian England. Past and Present 109: 55–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Wrightson, Keith. 2007. The ‘Decline of Neighbourliness’ Revisited. In Local Identities in Late Medieval and Early Modern England, ed. Norman L. Jones and Daniel Woolf, 19–49. Houndmills and New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Madeline Bassnett
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of English and Writing StudiesUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada

Personalised recommendations