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Technology, Conflict and International Relations

  • Stefan FritschEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Technological evolution has impacted foreign policy decision-making processes at the micro level by facilitating data gathering and speeding up decision-making processes, thus adding another window on government behavior and international conflict. A technology-driven skill revolution has also contributed to the emergence of new actors (non-governmental organizations and individuals), and technological evolution has reshaped armed conflict and related decision-making processes.

Keywords

Nuclear Weapon Armed Conflict International Relation Weapon System Material Artifact 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceBowling Green State UniversityBowling Green, OHUSA

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