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History, International Relations, and Conflict

  • Steve A. YetivEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines aspects of how international relations (IR) can benefit more greatly from history, with some emphasis on the study of international conflict from a social science angle. He argues that the historical study of change is especially vital to understanding IR and conflict in both theory and practice. Building off this exploration, he sketches a conceptual framework that bridges foreign policy at the sub-systemic level with IR in a new way to explain the behavior of states. Yetiv, who has conducted IR-oriented work as well as historically oriented research based on hundreds of documents that he declassified, argues that drawing on multiple disciplines and levels of analysis provides added leverage in explaining conflict and foreign policy.

Keywords

Foreign Policy Historical Work International Conflict World Politics International Relation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political Science and GeographyOld Dominion UniversityNorfolk, VAUSA

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