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Beyond Single Occupancy Vehicles: Automated Transit and Shared Mobility

  • Rongfang (Rachel) LiuEmail author
  • Daniel J. Fagnant
  • Wei-Bin Zhang
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Mobility book series (LNMOB)

Abstract

It is commonly accepted that Automated Transit will still be as relevant as it is now, if not more so, even when fully-automated vehicles become a reality. We need to develop a consensus on how vehicle automation will transform and perhaps disrupt the traditional transit systems, what new and different types of market-driven and publicly-run frameworks will emerge, and how we should invest our limited public resources. The two day session on Automated Transit and Shared Mobility Track (ATSM) during the 2015 Automated Vehicle Symposium (AVS) explored implications for the changing roles of transit and shared mobility as vehicle automation progresses. This chapter not only documents the main ideas presented during the symposium, but also supplements certain ideas with further discussions and clarifications after the conference.

Keywords

Automated transit Automated guideway transit Personal rapid transit Group rapid transit Automated personal transit Shared mobility 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rongfang (Rachel) Liu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Daniel J. Fagnant
    • 2
  • Wei-Bin Zhang
    • 3
  1. 1.New Jersey Institute of TechnologyUniversity HeightsNewarkUSA
  2. 2.University of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  3. 3.University of California at BerkeleyRichmondUSA

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