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Senior Citizens, Digital Information Seeking and Use of Social Media for Healthy Lifestyle

  • Ágústa PálsdóttirEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9755)

Abstract

The study investigated how Icelanders who are 60 years and older seek and communicate about digital health and lifestyle information of health and lifestyle information. Random samples were used and participants categorized into two groups, 60 to 67 years old and 68 years or older. The development of information seeking on the Internet in the years 2002, 2007 and 2012 was examined, as well as the use of social media in 2012. Data analysis was performed with ANOVA (one-way). The study revealed that the pattern of seeking and communicating about information was very similar for the age groups. The frequency for information seeking on the Internet was low for both groups, although it had increased since 2002. Results about social media revealed that both age groups chose to receive information rather than share it or communicate with others. The results further revealed that the frequency of using social media was low for both groups. The findings of the study indicate that senior citizens have not yet adapted to the digitalization of health and lifestyle information.

Keywords

Health information Information seeking Internet Senior citizens Social media 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The study was funded by the University of Iceland Research Fund.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Social and Human SciencesUniversity of IcelandReykjavíkIceland

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