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Foundation I—The Evolution of Film and Philosophy

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Abstract

The most pressing contemporary issue within the field of film and philosophy is the lack of a comprehensive understanding or methodology with which to establish a firm relationship between film and philosophy. Most theoreticians of film and philosophy have no clear structure for finding philosophical evidence in individual movies. In order to begin uncovering what kind of positive relationship can exist between film and philosophy, Shamir gives an historical overview of different theories that propose a methodological basis for the creation of philosophy through film. This examination provides a window onto the evolution of cinematic philosophy.

Keywords

Thought Experiment Philosophical Idea Cartesian Dualism Hollywood Film Recent Dialogue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.New YorkUSA

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