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Justification

  • Kevin McCain
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Part of the Springer Undergraduate Texts in Philosophy book series (SUTP)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the final component of the traditional account of knowledge: justification. Traditionally, justification has been understood as having good reasons for believing that a particular claim is true. The nature of these good reasons is examined in this chapter. In particular, practical reasons for accepting a particular claim are distinguished from epistemic reasons for accepting a particular claim. It is the epistemic reasons that are necessary for knowledge. Additionally, a major contemporary debate in epistemology concerning whether one always needs good reasons in order to be justified is explored in this chapter. Internalists say “yes”, but externalists say “no”. Some of the major moves in this debate are explained in this chapter. However, it becomes clear by the chapter’s end that whether internalists or externalists are correct in general, the sort of justification required for scientific knowledge does require good reasons, which are best understood as evidence.

Keywords

Good Reason True Belief Visual Experience Justify Belief Basic Belief 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin McCain
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA

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