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Managing the Indus in a Warming World: The Potential for Transboundary Cooperation in Coping with Climate Change

  • David MichelEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Water Security in a New World book series (WSEC)

Abstract

Decision-makers in Afghanistan, China, India, and Pakistan must reconcile a host of overlapping socioeconomic, ecological, and policy pressures to ensure their countries’ future water needs. Growing populations and expanding economies are driving rising water demands, even as environmental degradation and unsustainable consumption practices increasingly stretch the shared resources of the Indus River. Climate change will compound the challenges confronting water managers. None of the riparian states can successfully surmount these tests on its own. Greater dialogue and coordination among the basin’s diverse communities offers considerable scope for mitigating mutual threats and generating collective benefits. Collaborative approaches promoting data exchange, capacity building, and knowledge generation can help policymakers and the broader public better apprehend and assess the basin’s complex climate and water challenges. Common frameworks for identifying and adopting policy lessons can enlarge the range of policy choices, scale up best practices, and chart cooperative pathways forward.

Keywords

Indus Climate change Cooperation Integrated water resources management 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Stimson CenterWashington, DCUSA
  2. 2.The Geneva Centre for Security PolicyGenevaSwitzerland

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