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Human Research Ethics Guidelines in Australia

  • Colin ThomsonEmail author
  • Kerry J. Breen
  • Donald Chalmers
Chapter
Part of the The International Library of Ethics, Law and Technology book series (ELTE, volume 16)

Abstract

This chapter describes the human research ethics guidelines that have been issued by national government agencies in Australia between 1966 and the present time. The identity, statutory or formal authority to issue such guidelines of each of these agencies is described as is the composition of the committees and approval bodies of each of the issuing agencies. The processes that these agencies were required to follow in the development and issues of guidelines are examined, as well as the more informal processes that they adopted in guideline development. These include requirements for public consultation and promulgation. Finally, the chapter concludes with some reflections on the strengths and weaknesses of those processes and on the effects of recent statutory changes to the key agencies.

Keywords

Human research ethics: guidelines Government agencies: committee process Public consultation 

Notes

Competing Interests

The authors of the chapter have all had direct involvement in the development and issue of some of the guidelines and have drawn on their personal engagement as well as official records of this work.5

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colin Thomson
    • 1
    Email author
  • Kerry J. Breen
    • 2
  • Donald Chalmers
    • 3
  1. 1.Graduate School of MedicineUniversity of WollongongWollongongAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Forensic MedicineMonash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.Centre for Law and GeneticsUniversity of TasmaniaHobartAustralia

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