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Private Persons

  • Carl Wellman
Chapter
  • 213 Downloads
Part of the Law and Philosophy Library book series (LAPS, volume 115)

Abstract

The constitutional rights that first come to mind are rights of private persons. This chapter provides a critical examination of the reasons for or against the actual or proposed constitutional rights to life of the unborn child, to vote of resident aliens, to public education of illegal aliens, to habeas corpus of enemy combatants, to marriage of same-sex couples, to equal opportunity of disabled persons, to freedom of hate speech, to keep and carry assault weapons, and against the death penalty. Finally it explains different ways in which such reasons are relevant to constitutional rights.

Keywords

Death Penalty Equal Opportunity United States Constitution Unborn Child Private Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl Wellman
    • 1
  1. 1.Philosophy DepartmentWashington University in Saint LouisSaint LouisUSA

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