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The Relationships Between Policy, Boundaries and Research in Networked Learning

  • Thomas RybergEmail author
  • Christine Sinclair
Chapter
Part of the Research in Networked Learning book series (RINL)

Abstract

The biennial Networked Learning Conference is an established locus for work on practice, research and epistemology in the field of networked learning. That work continues between the conferences through the researchers’ own networks, ‘hot seat’ debates, and through publications, especially the books that include a selection of reworked and peer-reviewed papers from the conference. The 2014 Networked Learning Conference which was held in Edinburgh was characterised by animated dialogue on emergent influences affecting networked teaching and learning building on work established in earlier conferences, such as the inclusion of sociomaterial perspectives and recognition of informal networked learning. The chapters here each bring a particular perspective to the themes of Policy, Boundaries and Research in Networked Learning which we have chosen as the focus of the book. The selection of the papers has been a combined editorial and collaborative process based on our own initial review of the conference papers and notes from the conference, as well as an informal survey where we asked conference participants to recommend three papers they found particularly interesting. The papers for the Networked Learning Conference are all peer-reviewed, and as they have turned into chapters for this book, each has been re-reviewed by the editors and other authors. The result is a genuinely collegial distillation of themes from a stimulating conference; a snapshot of a time when national and international policies and boundaries have been changing.

Keywords

Educational Technology Network Learning Policy Network Digital Literacy Computer Support Collaborative Learn 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The conference held in Edinburgh 2014 was the ninth networked learning conference and we would like to call attention to the tremendous work of Vivien Hodgson and David McConnell in sustaining and developing the conference over the years. Since the first Networked Learning Conference in 1998 Vivien and David have been co-chairs of the conference and have, together with many others, been vital in sustaining and expanding a network of researchers and research environments that have endured and grown over the years. The 2014 conference was the first conference in which Maarten De Laat and Thomas Ryberg took the role as co-chairs to run the conference together with Sian Bayne, Christine Sinclair, Hamish McLeod and Jen Ross as the local organisers. We would all like to thank both Vivien and David for helping throughout the process by providing advice and sharing their experiences, but more so for their continued work to develop the conference and the research area of Networked Learning (together with many other people too numerous to mention in full). Their work has crystallised into the biennial conference, the present book series on research in networked learning, of which they serve as series editors and also a host of various research networks and projects on networked learning in and outside the EU. While the two first books in the series were reworked papers from the conference (Dirckinck Holmfeld, Hodgson, & McConnell, 2012; Hodgson et al., 2014b), as is the present book, there are now two other strong titles in the book series ( Jandric & Boras, 2015; Jones, 2015) and hopefully many more to come. We would also mention the role of Chris Jones, who has served as a permanent member of the scientific committee for the conference and has been invaluable in the process of planning the 2014 conference, as well as Alice Jesmont who has been the conference secretary since 2006, and involved in the planning of the 2016 conference in Lancaster .

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Communication and PsychologyAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark
  2. 2.Institute for Education, Community and SocietyUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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