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Adult Patient with True Resistant Hypertension

  • Massimo Salvetti
Chapter
Part of the Practical Case Studies in Hypertension Management book series (PCSHM)

Abstract

Resistant hypertension is defined by the 2013 ESH ESC Hypertension Guidelines as a systolic or a diastolic blood pressure that remains above goal (i.e. >140/90 mmHg for most patients), despite adherence to lifestyle measures and to pharmacological treatment with full doses of at least three antihypertensive medications, including one diuretic. This clinical case describes a patient with true resistant hypertension, a condition in which cardiovascular risk is high. Treatment of true resistant hypertension is a difficult task for the clinician; the therapeutic approach should be based on a well-chosen combination of drugs, tailored on the patient’s characteristics. Few studies are available for the choice of the fourth drug; and available data suggest that mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists or the alpha-1-blocker doxazosin may be effective and well tolerated in this condition.

Keywords

Serum Uric Acid Primary Aldosteronism Resistant Hypertension Target Organ Damage Relative Wall Thickness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Massimo Salvetti
    • 1
  1. 1.ASST Spedali Civili di BresciaClinica Medica-University of BresciaBresciaItaly

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