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Approaches to Modelling-Based Teaching

  • John K. Gilbert
  • Rosária Justi
Chapter
  • 1.4k Downloads
Part of the Models and Modeling in Science Education book series (MMSE, volume 9)

Abstract

To clarify the language used in the field, the distinction is drawn between ‘model-based teaching’ (the use of existing models by students) and ‘modelling-based teaching’ (MBT) (the creation and use of models by students). The range of activities that can be included in the two forms is reviewed and five generic types briefly described. The two types concerned with MBT are then discussed at some length and existing approaches to ‘learning to model de novo’ are reviewed. The use of the ‘Model of Modelling’ (MM) to base science teaching is discussed at some length and the skills that may be developed at each of its stages are established. The design and implementation of teaching sequences using MBT is presented with the use of case-study material. Finally, evidence of the impact on student learning of MBT conducted through the use of the MM is presented.

Keywords

Science Education Modelling Activity Pedagogical Content Knowledge Modelling Model Teaching Sequence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • John K. Gilbert
    • 1
  • Rosária Justi
    • 2
  1. 1.The University of ReadingBerkshireUK
  2. 2.Universidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil

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