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Educating Teachers to Facilitate Modelling-Based Teaching

  • John K. Gilbert
  • Rosária Justi
Chapter
  • 1.3k Downloads
Part of the Models and Modeling in Science Education book series (MMSE, volume 9)

Abstract

Successful modelling-based teaching makes specific and complex demands on the knowledge and skills of science teachers. Of the various categories of knowledge and skills involved, pedagogic content knowledge (PCK) has been the hardest to define precisely in respect of school-level education generally. In the relative absence until recently of research into the PCK involved specifically in MBT, and whilst we only have ‘best practice’ criteria for the conduct of science teacher education in general, little is known to date about how the PCK of MBT can be developed. In this chapter we have attempted to identify the PCK involved in MBT and have speculated on how that knowledge evolves in the light of an established model of ‘good practice’ over the passage of time and the aggregation of relevant professional experience. Most importantly, we have identified strategies that may be adopted by teachers within the practice of MBT if the requisite knowledge and skills are to become widely available.

Keywords

Professional Development Science Teaching Science Teacher Content Knowledge Pedagogical Content Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • John K. Gilbert
    • 1
  • Rosária Justi
    • 2
  1. 1.The University of ReadingBerkshireUK
  2. 2.Universidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil

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