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The Libor Case: A Focus on Barclays

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Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to describe the reputational impact of the Libor case on Barclays by outlining the ensuing process of rebuilding trust and implementing cultural changes. This chapter is organized as follows. First, we briefly describe the major elements of the Libor scandal, including the investigations, fines and regulatory actions. Then, we propose a focus on Barclays, the company that arguably experienced the most significant impact of the media scandal in 2012. In our case study, we describe the course of events that led Barclays into a reputational crisis, identify and describe the core elements of the restructuring concept. In closing, we consider the lessons learned from this series of events.

Keywords

Corporate Governance Global Reporting Initiative Balance Scorecard Financial Service Authority Interbank Market 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University Magna GraeciaCatanzaroItaly

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