Advertisement

Achievement in Mathematics: Comparative Analysis from East Africa

Chapter
  • 603 Downloads
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Education book series (BRIEFSEDUCAT)

Abstract

Against a perception that results in mathematics are low, this chapter examines available data on achievement across the region, including two datasets based on surveys in the primary sector—Uwezo and SACMEQ—and O levels and equivalent. Common themes which emerged were wide variations across countries and within countries, with youngsters from urban areas performing more highly than rural. Whilst most surveys showed girls performing less well than girls, this was not uniformly the case. Unclear trends need to be put into the context of increased enrollment in the secondary sector. Where examiners’ reports were available, common issues which arose were lack of use of the methods required and engaging with multi-step problems expressed in words, consistent with problems in using English as a medium. No indication in the reports reviewed was given of problems with the questions themselves, despite a number of mistakes being uncovered. In working towards harmonization, a review is needed as to how assessment systems can most effectively support high quality learning in the region.

References

  1. Barrett, A. M., Mtana, N., Osaki, K., & Rubagumya, C. (2014). Baseline study report, ‘Strengthening secondary education in practice’: Language supportive teaching and textbooks in Tanzania (LSTT). Bristol, UK: University of Bristol.Google Scholar
  2. Black, P. J. (1998). Testing: Friend or foe? Theory and practice of assessment and testing. London: The Falmer Press.Google Scholar
  3. Hungi, N., Makuwa, D., Ross, K., Saito, M., Dolata, S., van Cappelle, F., & Vellien, J. (2010). SACMEQ III project results: Pupil achievement levels in reading and mathematics. Praetoria: SACMEQ.Google Scholar
  4. Kenya National Examination Council. (2012). The year 2011 KCSE examination report. Nairobi: KNEC.Google Scholar
  5. Kenya National Examination Council. (2013). The year 2012 KCSE examination report. Nairobi: KNEC.Google Scholar
  6. Ministry of Education and Vocational Training. (2011). Basic education statistics in Tanzania (BEST) 2007–2011: Revised national data. Dar es Salaam: MOEVT.Google Scholar
  7. Ministry of Education and Vocational Training. (2012). Basic education statistics in Tanzania (BEST) 2008–2012: Revised national data. Dar es Salaam: MOEVT.Google Scholar
  8. Ministry of Education and Vocational Training. (2013). Basic education statistics in Tanzania (BEST) 2009–2013: Revised national data. Dar es Salaam: MOEVT.Google Scholar
  9. Uganda Bureau of Statistics. (2011, October 12). Trend of key secondary school education indicators (2005–2009). Retrieved on November 29, 2013, from http://www.ubos.org/?st=pagerelations2&id=21&p=related%20pages%202:Education%20Statistics
  10. Uganda National Examinations Board. (2010). Report on work of candidates UCE 2009. Kampala: UNEB.Google Scholar
  11. Uganda National Examinations Board. (2011). Report on work of candidates UCE 2010. Kampala: UNEB.Google Scholar
  12. Uganda National Examinations Board. (2013). The achievement of S2 students and teachers in English language, mathematics and biology. Kampala: Uganda National Examinations Board.Google Scholar
  13. Uwezo East Africa. (2012). Are our children learning? Literacy and numeracy across East Africa. Dar es Salaam: Uwezo East Africa.Google Scholar
  14. Uworwabayeho, A. (2014). Rwandan S3 examination results. Private communication, August 28, 2014.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Open Access This book was originally published with exclusive rights reserved by the Publisher in 2016 and was licensed as an open access publication in November 2020 under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits any noncommercial use, sharing, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence and indicate if you modified the licensed material. You do not have permission under this licence to share adapted material derived from this book or parts of it.

The images or other third party material in this book may be included in the book's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material or in the Correction Note appended to the book. For details on rights and licenses please read the Correction  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27258-0_7. If material is not included in the book's Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Aga Khan University Institute for Educational Development East AfricaDar es SalaamTanzania

Personalised recommendations