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Virtual and Consistent Hyperbolic Tree: A New Structure for Distributed Database Management

  • Telesphore Tiendrebeogo
  • Damien MagoniEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9466)

Abstract

We describe a new structure called Virtual and Consistent Hyperbolic tree (VCH-tree) for implementing a distributed database system. This structure is based on the hyperbolic geometry and can support queries over large spatial data sets, distributed over interconnected servers. The VCH-tree is comparable to the well-known R-tree structure, but it leverages the hyperbolic geometry properties of the Poincaré disk model. It maintains a balanced Q-degree spatial tree that scales with insertions of data objects into a large number of servers, reachable through hyperbolic coordinates. A user application manipulates the structure from a client node. The client can connect to the system through one of the servers that is already in the VCH-tree. Messages are then routed towards the proper server by a greedy algorithm which uses the hyperbolic coordinates attributed to each server. We have performed simulations to assess the efficiency and reliability of the VCH-tree. Results show that our VCH-tree exhibits expected performances for being used by distributed database applications.

Keywords

Data Object Database Server Hyperbolic Plane Distribute Hash Table Hyperbolic Geometry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Polytechnic University of Bobo-DioulassoBobo-DioulassoBurkina Faso
  2. 2.LaBRIUniversity of BordeauxTalenceFrance

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