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The Electric Grid Trembles When Wind and Solar Join the High Wire Act

  • Alice J. FriedemannEmail author
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Energy book series (BRIEFSENERGY)

Abstract

If we are to have electric transportation—I am not talking about golf carts here—we are going to have to grow the grid. To use electricity as a transportation fuel, we will need more electricity, and perhaps a national grid. While sustaining current uses, how much supplemental transportation energy would it be possible for such a grid to support?

Keywords

Wind Turbine Capacity Factor Peak Demand National Grid Renewable Power 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.OaklandUSA

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