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Psychosocial Services/Management of Depression

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Abstract

Depression is one of the most common psychosocial problems encountered in the cancer setting. Within the context of newly mandated universal screening and provision of comprehensive psychosocial care that is integrated into the routine care of cancer patients, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has recently established clinical practice guidelines for the management of depression and anxiety [1]. The convergence of growing healthcare and health system complexity and clinical demands requires the development of integrated systems of psychosocial care that are cost effective and adaptable to diverse cancer care systems. While screening patients for depression has received primary focus, it is the subsequent steps, i.e., what to do with the information to best benefit the patient, that pose the most challenges. Research in oncology has confirmed findings in other medical settings that screening alone without an integrated system to ensure the appropriate triage, treatment, and follow-up of distressed individuals is not likely to be cost-effective in improving outcomes [2]. Toward the goal of patient-centered care and considering the often-daunting burden of multiple medications and medical appointments that cancer patients must face, healthcare providers must work with patients to negotiate a mutually agreeable treatment plan, taking into account patient preferences, and spend time to fully engage them in treatment. If adherence with treatment is poor, potential barriers to care or alternative treatment options should be thoroughly explored.

Keywords

  • Palliative Care
  • Suicidal Ideation
  • Cancer Setting
  • Collaborative Care
  • Chronic Care Model

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Jesse R. Fann MD, MPH .

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Fann, J.R., Artherholt, S.B., Evans, V. (2016). Psychosocial Services/Management of Depression. In: Alberts, D., Lluria-Prevatt, M., Kha, S., Weihs, K. (eds) Supportive Cancer Care. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24814-1_4

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