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Psychosocial Oncology

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Abstract

Psycho-oncology is a specialized area of clinical practice and research that addresses the psychological and social well-being of cancer patients and their family members, as well as the integration of patient-centered care with the entire oncology treatment team. Psycho-oncology interventions contribute to cancer prevention, detection, treatment, and long-term survival. They optimize the ability of patients, their family members, and their healthcare team to understand their emotional responses, to think clearly about what they want for themselves, to align their behavior to reach these goals, to engage with others in the service of thriving to prevent cancer, and to adapt to cancer treatment and the survivorship experience.

Keywords

  • Psychosocial Intervention
  • Psychosocial Care
  • Psychosocial Adaptation
  • Lymphocyte Proliferative Response
  • Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Karen Weihs MD .

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Weihs, K. (2016). Psychosocial Oncology. In: Alberts, D., Lluria-Prevatt, M., Kha, S., Weihs, K. (eds) Supportive Cancer Care. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24814-1_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24814-1_3

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

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