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Health Economic and Outcomes Research in Cancer

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Abstract

A substantial clinical and economic burden of illness is extolled upon persons across the spectrum of cancer, also impacting the welfare of society overall [1, 2]. This burden persists despite marked improvements in survival rates in recent decades. Cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States, with estimates over 1.7 million new cancer cases diagnosed in 2014 to exceed $217 billion in direct medical treatment costs or costs due to premature morbidity and mortality [1, 2]. Despite recent advances to improve prevention, detection, and treatment with approximately 1,000 investigational drugs in development, tremendous barriers continue to persist in cancer that ultimately impede optimal care for patients [3, 4]. Based upon their assessment of quality of care in the United States, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) National Cancer Policy Board (1999) stated, “There is no national cancer care program or system of care in the United States. Like other chronic illnesses, efforts to diagnose and treat cancer are centered on individual physicians, health plans, and cancer care centers.” [4]. In creating a vision for the future, the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Board (1999) description of a “system of ideal cancer care” was defined as one that would:

Keywords

  • Cancer Care
  • Health Technology Assessment
  • Standard Gamble
  • Comparative Effectiveness Research
  • Patient Report Outcome Measurement Information System

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Skrepnek, G.H. (2016). Health Economic and Outcomes Research in Cancer. In: Alberts, D., Lluria-Prevatt, M., Kha, S., Weihs, K. (eds) Supportive Cancer Care. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24814-1_17

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24814-1_17

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