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Genetic Counseling and Risk Assessment

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Abstract

Since the early 2000s, improved understanding of the molecular biology of disease has led to the “era of personalized medicine.” Personalized medicine refers to the use of genetic, genomic, and other individual characteristics and exposures to define disease in an individual and to influence treatment and management decisions. With the wealth of genetic information now available, significant advances have been made in the prevention and treatment of many types of cancer, and the interpretation and communication of this information are an important clinical need.

Keywords

  • Cancer Risk
  • Genetic Counseling
  • Male Breast Cancer
  • Genetic Discrimination
  • Cowden Syndrome

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Joanne M. Jeter MD .

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Jeter, J.M. (2016). Genetic Counseling and Risk Assessment. In: Alberts, D., Lluria-Prevatt, M., Kha, S., Weihs, K. (eds) Supportive Cancer Care. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24814-1_15

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24814-1_15

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-24812-7

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-24814-1

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