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Nutrition and the Cancer Survivor

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Abstract

Approximately 1.6 million new cases of cancer are diagnosed annually, accounting for 22.9 % of deaths in the USA [1]. When deaths are aggregated by age, cancer has surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of death for individuals under the age of 85 years. For men, prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer followed by lung and colorectal, while breast, lung, and colorectal cancers are the most commonly diagnosed cancers in women. These four cancers account for one-half of the total cancer deaths. Additionally in the USA, approximately 600,000 adults are expected to die annually from cancer, accounting for a little over 1500 deaths per day.

Keywords

  • Physical Activity
  • Cancer Survivor
  • Regular Physical Activity
  • Processed Meat
  • Colorectal Cancer Survivor

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Mary Marian DCN, RDN, CSO, FAND .

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Marian, M., Piepenburg, D. (2016). Nutrition and the Cancer Survivor. In: Alberts, D., Lluria-Prevatt, M., Kha, S., Weihs, K. (eds) Supportive Cancer Care. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24814-1_13

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24814-1_13

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