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Analysis of the Problem of Interference of the Public Network Operators to GSM-R

  • Marek SumiłaEmail author
  • Andrzej Miszkiewicz
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 531)

Abstract

The article presents current state of knowledge of the impact of public mobile networks in the 900 MHz band to GSM-R communication. At the beginning we will present the main problem of interfering networks and the effects of this impact on the receivers GSM-R. In the next paragraph will be introduced an analysis of recorded cases of interference on the GSM-R in the EU and case study of blocking due to Polish case.

Keywords

GSM-R Safety Network interference 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Warsaw University of TechnologyWarsawPoland
  2. 2.Institute of RailwayWarsawPoland

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