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Challenges to the Use of NDVI in Land Degradation Assessments

  • Genesis T. Yengoh
  • David Dent
  • Lennart Olsson
  • Anna E. Tengberg
  • Compton J. TuckerIII
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Environmental Science book series (BRIEFSENVIRONMENTAL)

Abstract

Technological barriers: Currently, most global datasets useful for environmental applications are archived in databases that can be accessed using the Internet. These include the GIMMS, NOAA-PAL, LTD, and FASIR datasets. There are also free online data service platforms for executing preprocessing operations (such as data smoothing, spatial and temporal subsetting, mosaiking, and re-projection) of MODIS time-series vegetation indices (such as NDVI and EVI). Currently, the Internet speed for many parts of the world remains too slow to enable effective access to these datasets or online processing.

References

  1. Liang S (2005) Quantitative remote sensing of land surfaces, vol 30. Wiley, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  2. Wessels KJ, Prince SD, Frost PE, van Zyl D (2004) Assessing the effects of human-induced land degradation in the former homelands of northern South Africa with a 1 km AVHRR NDVI time-series. Remote Sens Environ 91(1):47–67. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2004.02.005

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Genesis T. Yengoh
    • 1
  • David Dent
    • 2
  • Lennart Olsson
    • 1
  • Anna E. Tengberg
    • 1
  • Compton J. TuckerIII
    • 3
  1. 1.Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies - LUCSUSLundSweden
  2. 2.Chestnut Tree Farm, Forncett EndNorthfolkUK
  3. 3.Department of Hydrospheric and Biospheric SciencesNASA Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbeltUSA

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