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The Evolution of Nutrition Information

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Part of the SpringerBriefs in Food, Health, and Nutrition book series (BRIEFSFOOD)

Abstract

The use of labelling helps to reduce information asymmetries between producers and customers. Indeed, it supports consumers in the process of detecting and evaluating qualitative product features, with particular regard to intrinsic or indirect features such as flavour, which cannot be assessed before purchasing or consumption. The utility of this information in product choices varies according to consumer mood at the time of purchasing, but it is also affected by subjective processes, habits and motivations. Moreover, it is also important to understand how consumers perceive and interpret the information indicated on labels. In the context of nutrition labelling, given its relevance to consumer diet composition, worldwide legislators have introduced specific formats on nutrition labelling with time, to support a correct understanding of nutrition information by consumers. Following the presentation on the evolution of nutrition labelling with EU regulations and other formats applied in the USA, as well as those used in other main countries, the chapter discusses both resolved issues and issues that still exist in the present system of nutrition labelling.

Keywords

European directive Nutrition Food Size European regulation Labelling Information Serving size Products Mandatory  

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of PisaPisaItaly

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