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Serious Game Mechanics, Workshop on the Ludo-Pedagogical Mechanism

  • T. LimEmail author
  • S. Louchart
  • N. Suttie
  • J. Baalsrud Hauge
  • J. Earp
  • M. Ott
  • S. Arnab
  • D. Brown
  • I. A. Stanescu
  • F. Bellotti
  • M. Carvalho
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9221)

Abstract

Research in Serious Games (SG), as a whole, faces two main challenges in understanding the transition between the instructional design and actual game design implementation and documenting an evidence-based mapping of game design patterns onto relevant pedagogical patterns. From a practical perspective, this transition lacks methodology and requires a leap of faith from a prospective customer in the ability of a SG developer to deliver a game that will achieve the desired learning outcomes. A series of workshops were thus conducted to present and apply a preliminary exposition though a purpose-processing methodology to probe various SG design aspects, in particular how serious game design patterns map with pedagogical practices. The objective was to encourage dialogue and debate on core assumptions and emerging challenges to help develop robust methods and strategies to better SG design and its interconnectedness with pedagogy.

Keywords

Game mechanics Learning mechanics Ludo-pedagogy mapping Pedagogically-driven game design Patterns 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This project is partially funded under the European Community Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007 2013), Grant Agreement nr. 258169 and EPSRC/IMRC grants 113946 and 112430.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Lim
    • 1
    Email author
  • S. Louchart
    • 1
  • N. Suttie
    • 1
  • J. Baalsrud Hauge
    • 2
  • J. Earp
    • 3
  • M. Ott
    • 3
  • S. Arnab
    • 4
  • D. Brown
    • 5
  • I. A. Stanescu
    • 6
  • F. Bellotti
    • 7
  • M. Carvalho
    • 7
  1. 1.Heriot-Watt UniversityRiccarton, EdinburghScotland, UK
  2. 2.Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik (BIBA)BremenGermany
  3. 3.Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR)GenoaItaly
  4. 4.Serious Games InstituteCoventry UniversityCoventryUK
  5. 5.Serious Games InteractiveCopenhagenDenmark
  6. 6.National Defence University “Carol I”BucharestRomania
  7. 7.University of GenoaGenoaItaly

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