Advertisement

The Design and Play of Geogames as Place-Based Education

Chapter
  • 743 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Geographic Information Science book series (AGIS)

Abstract

A key affordance of games and technologies that emphasize geolocativity is their ability to bring people to new places, and mobilize aspects of those places to facilitate playful and interactive experiences. At a basic level, we can think of a mobile application’s ability to locate where you are (via GPS, QR codes, Bluetooth beacons, image recognition, etc.) and use that information to direct you towards specific objects or locations within a place or encourage particular types of interactions. Not only where you are, but what you do in specific locations (e.g. take and share photos) can become part of a mediated experience that encourages you to act and interact differently in the world. Games that take into account a person’s physical location can be single or multiplayer: relying on players’ co-presence in a given place either synchronously or asynchronously, or designed to elicit interactions among users in different places, where each player contributes based on the unique features of their location. In essence, mobile technologies can provide new ways of knowing where you are: from highlighting your position in time and space to helping you identify and interpret your surroundings, to cultivating new sociocultural and identity based modes of awareness. Geogames can amplify these possibilities by providing the conditions (e.g., the context and inspiration) needed to encourage players to take action within a particular place. As a result, game authors can facilitate new ways of seeing the world, open new modes of access to the worlds that players already encounter, and create new worlds and narratives layered on top of existing reality.

References

  1. Dikkers S, Martin J, Coulter B (eds) (2012) Mobile media learning: amazing uses of mobile devices for learning. ETC, PittsburghGoogle Scholar
  2. Gagnon D (2010) ARIS: an open source platform for developing mobile learning experiences. Master’s thesis, University of WisconsinGoogle Scholar
  3. Gruenewald D (2003) The best of both worlds: a critical pedagogy of place. Educational Researcher 32(4):3–12CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Gruenewald D, Smith G (eds) (2008) Place-based education in the global age: local diversity. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  5. Holden C, Sykes J (2012) Mentira: prototyping language-based locative gameplay. In: Dikkers S, Martin J, Coulter B (eds) Mobile media learning: amazing uses of mobile devices for teaching and learning. ETC, Pittsburgh, pp 113–129Google Scholar
  6. Holden C, Dikkers S, Martin J, Litts B (eds) (2015) Mobile media learning: inspiration and innovation. ETC, PittsburghGoogle Scholar
  7. Holden C (2015) ARIS: augmented reality for interactive storytelling. In: Holden C, Dikkers S, Martin J, Litts B (eds) Mobile media learning: inspiration and innovation. ETC, Pittsburgh, pp 67–83Google Scholar
  8. Klopfer E, Squire K (2004) Getting your socks wet: augmented reality environmental science. In: Proceedings of the sixth international conference of the learning sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, 23–26 June 2004Google Scholar
  9. Macklin C, Guster T (2012) Reactivism: serendipity in the streets. In: Dikkers S, Martin J, Coulter B (eds) Mobile media learning: amazing uses of mobile devices for teaching and learning. ETC, Pittsburgh, pp 151–169Google Scholar
  10. Martin J (2009) Mystery trip. In: Dikkers S, Martin J, Coulter B (eds) Mobile media learning: amazing uses of mobile devices for teaching and learning. ETC, Pittsburgh, pp 99–110Google Scholar
  11. Mathews J (2009) A window to the past: using augmented reality games to support historical inquiry. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association annual meeting, San Diego, CA, 13–17 April 2009Google Scholar
  12. Mathews J, Squire K (2009) Augmented reality gaming and game design as a new literacy practice. In: Tyner K (ed) Media literacy: new agendas in communication. Routledge, New York, pp 209–232Google Scholar
  13. Mathews J (2010) Using a studio-based pedagogy to engage students in the design of mobile-based media. English teaching: practice and critique 9(1):87–102Google Scholar
  14. Mathews J, Holden R (2012) Place-based design for civic participation. In: Dikkers S, Martin J, Coulter B (eds) Mobile media learning: amazing uses of mobile devices for teaching and learning. ETC, Pittsburgh, pp 151–169Google Scholar
  15. Mobile UW (n.d.-a) Field research project: WeBird. https://mobile.wisc.edu/mli-projects/field-research-project-webird/. Accessed 3 Sept 2014
  16. Mobile UW (n.d.-b) Project: SustainableU. https://mobile.wisc.edu/mli-projects/project-sustainable-u/. Accessed 3 Sept 2014
  17. Orr D (1994) Earth in mind: on education, environment, and the human prospect. Island Press, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  18. Rosenkrantz H (2014) Jewish time travel gets real. The Covenant Foundation. http://www.covenantfn.org/news/152/Jewish-Time-Travel-Gets-Real. Accessed 3 Sep 2014
  19. Smith G, Sobel D (2010) Place and community based education in schools. Routledge, LondonGoogle Scholar
  20. Squire K, Dikkers S (2012) Amplifications of learning: use of mobile media devices among youth. Convergence 18(4):445–464CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Squire K, Jan M (2007) Mad city mystery: developing scientific argumentation skills with a place-based augmented reality game on handheld computers. J Sci Educ Technol 16(1):5–29CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Squire K, Jan M, Mathews J, Wagler M, Devane B, Holden C (2007) Wherever you go, there you are: place-based augmented reality games for learning. In: Sheldon B, Wiley D (eds) The design and use of simulation computer games in education. Sense Publishing, Rotterdam, pp 265–296Google Scholar
  23. Wagler, M. & Mathews, J. (2012). Up River: Place, ethnography, and design in the St. Louis River Estuary. In S. Dikkers, J. Martin, & B. Coulter (Eds.). Mobile media learning: Amazing uses of mobile devices for teaching and learning (41–60). Pittsburgh, PA: ETC PressGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Field Day LabUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA
  2. 2.University of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA

Personalised recommendations