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Hunger Strikes and Other Controversial Cases

  • Mirko Daniel Garasic
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Ethics book series (BRIEFSETHIC)

Abstract

In order to substantiate the claim made in Chap.  3, the attention of this book will now shift towards a further two controversial cases relating to the [mis]use of the notion of autonomy. The first case relates to the forced treatment of a burns victim desirous of death, and despite dating back nearly three decades, it remains very topical, raising important questions pertinent to the current study.

Keywords

European Union Anorexia Nervosa Competent Patient Italian Context Social Body 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Edmond J. Safra Center for EthicsTel Aviv University Tel Aviv Israel

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