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English Language Education Policies in the People’s Republic of China

  • Jeffrey GilEmail author
Part of the Language Policy book series (LAPO, volume 11)

Abstract

This chapter views language policy as consisting of language practices, language beliefs and language intervention, planning or management (Spolsky. Language policy. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2004; Spolsky. What is language policy? In: Spolsky B (ed) The Cambridge handbook of language policy. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 3–15, 2012), and uses this view to describe and analyze English language education policies in China. Particular attention is given to the evolution of official views, that is the opinions and perceptions of the government, and popular views, that is the opinions and perceptions of the general public, towards English, and official efforts to build English language proficiency through the provision of English language education from the establishment of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) until the present day. This is followed by an overview of the current English language curriculum at the various levels of China’s education system. This chapter also assesses the effects of English language education policy on language practices, in terms of the use of English within China and levels of English language proficiency. Finally, it outlines some policy challenges and possible future trends based on policy outcomes and the broader sociolinguistic situation of China.

Keywords

Bilingual instruction China Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) English as a global language English language curriculum English language education Ethnic minorities Language policy Language promotion 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Flinders UniversityAdelaideAustralia

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