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Introduction: The Challenges for English Education Policies in Asia

  • Robert KirkpatrickEmail author
  • Thuy Thi Ngoc Bui
Part of the Language Policy book series (LAPO, volume 11)

Abstract

This chapter introduces the volume and considers the realities, possibilities, and challenges of English language policies with reference to a wide range of socio-political, economic, and linguistic shifts among Asian countries. It reflects on English language policies in the countries through addressing three dominant aspects: (1) the relationship of the English language spread and the English language ability for educational, economic, cultural and political equity, and the effects on local/indigenous languages; (2) educational challenges of the current English language policies such as teacher education, English learning environment, national curriculums, pedagogies, English proficiency, evaluation; and (3) approaches to improve English education policies.

Keywords

Language policy English education Education in Asia Minority languages English as an international language 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.English FacultyGulf University of Science and TechnologyHawallyKuwait
  2. 2.The University of SydneySydneyAustralia

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