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Social Networking, Communication and Student Partnerships

  • Derek FranceEmail author
  • W. Brian Whalley
  • Alice Mauchline
  • Victoria Powell
  • Katharine Welsh
  • Alex Lerczak
  • Julian Park
  • Robert Bednarz
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Ecology book series (BRIEFSECOLOGY)

Abstract

This chapter describes some of the ways in which mobile devices can be used to facilitate communication while on fieldwork. Social networks provide an informal way to share information by communicating within public networks (as in Case Study 19). Additionally, closed groups within social networks can provide a private online learning environment (as in Case Study 20) or to provide an environment for role-play or simulation exercises that require a communication channel (as in Case Study 21). Ways of communicating with and engaging an audience during fieldwork are also described. The final section is about student partnerships and how these can be used to develop novel learning tools.

Keywords

Social networking Student communication Student partnership App development Online learning environment 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Derek France
    • 1
    Email author
  • W. Brian Whalley
    • 2
  • Alice Mauchline
    • 3
  • Victoria Powell
    • 1
  • Katharine Welsh
    • 1
  • Alex Lerczak
    • 1
  • Julian Park
    • 3
  • Robert Bednarz
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Geography and International DevelopmentUniversity of ChesterChesterUK
  2. 2.Department of GeographyUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK
  3. 3.School of Agriculture, Policy and DevelopmentUniversity of ReadingReadingUK
  4. 4.Department of GeographyTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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