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The Institutional Framework for Planning Instruments and Heritage Protection

  • Francesco RotondoEmail author
Chapter
  • 466 Downloads
Part of the Springer Geography book series (SPRINGERGEOGR)

Abstract

After the author re-read synthetically the planning system in Italy, which since 2001 has become increasingly regionalized, this chapter addresses the role that cultural heritage and landscape play in this system. It highlights the potential and the limits of the national framework indicating possible developments driven by the changes that both the economic crisis and those in economic markets and societal attitudes have brought.

Keywords

Planning instruments Heritage protection Urban planning law 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil Engineering and ArchitecturePolytechnic University of Bari (Italy)BariItaly

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