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Discussion and Conclusions

  • Jessica LindblomEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Cognitive Systems Monographs book series (COSMOS, volume 26)

Abstract

This chapter summarizes the main contributions of this book, compares it with related work, and considers what kind of a body is necessary for cognition as well as the uniqueness of human cognition. It also discusses some methodological issues, and presents some implications to AI and socially interactive technology. It also offers some ideas for future research, and the book concludes with some closing remarks.

Keywords

Social Interaction Joint Attention Interactive Technology Human Child Human Social Interaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of InformaticsUniversity of SkövdeSkövdeSweden

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